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That depends on the molecule and its symmetries. For example, a molecule of an ideal monoatomic gas cannot rotate because it is spherically symmetric. A typical diatomic gas molecule, like $N_2$ could rotate about two axes because it is axisymmetric so it cannot rotate about its axis of symmetry. A more complicated gas molecule, like water vapor, can rotate ...


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Believe what you may, the sentence I believe that that standard for making calculations can be simplified to another standard that gives rise to an entirely different simplified quantum mechanical theory that doesn't talk about nuclear chemistry at all that can explain hybridization of orbitals and wave functions and is relativistic. is unlikely to be ...


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The degrees of freedom for a 3D polyatomic gas molecule are $6$ at normal temperature. But as there is only one vibrational mode so the degrees of freedom become $6+2=8$. Hence $C_v=fR/2$ so $C_v=4R$. Here we add 2 because in a polyatomic gas molecule no.of vibrational mode is $3N-6$ (for non linear). So $3 \cdot 3-6=3$. But only one vibrational mode is ...


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The degree of freedom for a 3D polyatomic gas molecule is 6 at normal temperature...... But as there is only one vibrational mode so the degree of freedom becomes 6+2=8. Hence Cv=fR/2 so Cv=4R


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Compounds having even number of total electrons will be diamagnetic 10 and 16 are exceptions They Will be paramagnetic


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Maybe it is too late to answer this question but let me give you an answer for you and for those who see this question. Around the intensity of the laser field of $10^{15}$ $W/cm^2$, both a tunneling ionization and a over-the-barrier ionization can take place depending on the type of molecule or timing of a pulsed laser field. With low ionization energy ...


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First, your first question ("what kind of dipole is it?") is not clear for me. Then, please correct me if I misunderstand you: we consider solid-state system which consists of biphenyl fragments with substituents? In my view, the answer is simple. $\pi$-system has a quadrupole moment (at least in a certain approximation because multipole expansion consists ...


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I'm wondering if I try to simulate their behaviour in ordinary life using really little balls will they approxitamate the behaviour of liquid molecules? No. We can proceed in a similar way of finding the limit of a function in calculus. Starting with coarse sand, we can replacing it with finer grains, until it is a kind of dry mud. It makes any ...


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What you are describing is often called The Butterfly Effect. That name comes from the notion that a butterfly, flapping its wings in China, could have an impact on the weather in Canada. This is a part of Chaos Theory, where it is impossible to make a prediction on an outcome because of many many small variables. In a physics forum, like this, we are ...


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In a live game being broadcast by radio or television waves, the signals will reach you at the speed of light. Anything you could do to the air molecules could travel no faster than the speed of sound, which is much slower than light. The game would most likely be over before any atmospheric effects could reach there. So, unless you interacted with the game ...


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Global warming potential is given per mole, but you plot the atmospheric column-integrated effect. Methane concentrations are about 2 ppm in the atmosphere, that of $\rm CO_2$ is 400 ppm, still methane manages to make a visible blip in the total atmospheric absorption plot. As to any molecules "why is X a GHG, but Y is not?", the answer is in short "the ...


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