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33 votes

Why no proton microscopes? Proton diffraction; or proton scattering experiments? Proton crystallography?

What do protons offer that electrons and photons don't? Well, mass: $$ \frac{M_p}{m_e} \approx 1837 $$ What that means is that protons can travel through large $Z$ materials without undergoing ...
JEB's user avatar
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21 votes
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Why no proton microscopes? Proton diffraction; or proton scattering experiments? Proton crystallography?

Proton crystallography is not typically done because protons have a very shallow penetration depth compared to electrons, photons/x-rays, or neutrons with the same energy. This means that for a proton ...
KF Gauss's user avatar
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16 votes
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Why viruses cannot be seen?

Seeing means imaging using optical methods, which range from 400 nm (violet) to 750 nm (dark red). A single SARS-CoV-2 virus measures 120 nm so the virus so is much smaller than optical wavelengths. ...
my2cts's user avatar
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10 votes
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Why don't we have proton/neutron microscopes?

It seems that proton microscopes exist Recently a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR) has been designed, constructed and successfully commissioned at GSI ...
anna v's user avatar
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5 votes

Is this incredible microscope technology real?

Hoax. Let's read the caption of the picture: Note "energy lines" extending from atoms' nuclei ...energy lines? Does that sound serious to you? Ok, let's do an internet search (Elmer Nemes ...
valerio's user avatar
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5 votes
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How do electron microscopes not get obstructed by atoms in the air?

Electron microscopes, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), are both operated under high ($10^{-6}-10^{-8}$ Torr) or ultra high vacuum ($<10^{-9}$ Torr) ...
physicopath's user avatar
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5 votes

Focal length vs working distance in an infinity corrected objective

You are correct that for a single lens the working distance would be the focal length. For compound lenses, like microscope objectives, you have to look at the entire optical system to figure out the ...
Chad Sexington's user avatar
5 votes

Why viruses cannot be seen?

Per the question, "So, is the size of a virus the real explanation to the fact that they cannot be seen should the correct explanation be due the fact that we cannot put together as many viruses as it ...
S. McGrew's user avatar
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4 votes
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Can you please explain me phenomenon of reflection at subatomic level?

The linked video shows a TEM image. In transmission electron microscopy, you have a parallel beam of electrons incident on the material, which gets scattered by the atoms in the material. Note that, ...
Hari's user avatar
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4 votes

Why can’t we see atoms in an optical microscope?

The size of atoms is about 1 Angstrom ($=10^{-10}$meters), whereas the wavelength of electromagnetic waves in the optical range is several hundred nanometers ($~10^{-7}$ meter) - about a thousand ...
Roger V.'s user avatar
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3 votes

What are these microscope circles?

As suggested in comments these circles are airy disks around dust particles on the camera lens. After wiping the lens few of them were left and the remaining ones moved. You can find out more about ...
Aalex Gabi's user avatar
3 votes

Why does and object need to be in focus when taking a picture?

For an object to be in focus, it needs to be a certain distance $o$ from the lens, while the lens, with a focal length $f$, is a distance $d$ from the sensor (film, etc) where $$\frac{1}{f}=\frac{1}{...
Floris's user avatar
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3 votes

Electron Microscopy: Are photons smaller than electrons?

Here is a basic overview- experts are invited to add detail. Subatomic particles like electrons actually possess a wavelength that is related to their energy, even though they behave most of the ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
3 votes
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Derive resolving power of Heisenberg Microscope

This problem comes down to the fact that, in general, the diffraction integral cannot be solved. I think some of the important features of the problem can be found without solving it. Imagine the ...
Finncent Price's user avatar
3 votes
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How can a picture of a virus be taken when they are not even 300 nm (wavelength of blue light) long?

Pictures like this can be taken with an electron microscope, where the effective wavelength of the illuminating beam is far shorter than that of visible light. Those pictures are in black & white ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
3 votes

Why viruses cannot be seen?

The human eye is an optical instrument, which is subject to diffractive limits, optical aberrations and biological limitations (receptor size in the retina). The angular resolution of the human eye ...
AlphaLife's user avatar
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3 votes

If ordinary electron microscopes have wavelengths 5,000 times or more shorter than visible light, why can't they see atoms?

They aren't. Individual atom locations can be seen in transmission electron microscopy and field-ion microscopy.
niels nielsen's user avatar
3 votes
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Magnification of a compound microscope

Angular magnification is used when linear magnification is not defined. This is the case if an object or an intermediate image is in the focal plane of considered lens (for the compound microscope: ...
oliver's user avatar
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3 votes

What is integration time in microscopy?

Its the parameter input that tells the detector how long to collect light before moving on. It determines the exposure of your detector. During this time interval the detector signal gets superimposed ...
TheImperfectCrazy's user avatar
3 votes
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Why a mode-locked reduce the integration time in microscopy?

Two-photon absorption is a nonlinear process, so the higher you can make the excitation intensity, the more efficient the process becomes. The highest light intensities easily available in an optical ...
Gilbert's user avatar
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3 votes
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How exactly can you "grab" a single atom with a scanning tunneling microscope?

The molecule man was created using lateral manipulation. In this case the tip "drags" the atom around on the substrate, but does not remove it. The forces from the tip are sufficient to ...
BowlOfRed's user avatar
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2 votes

How does an electron beam condenser work?

The magnetic lenses used in electron microscopy look very different from those used for particles accelerators (where quadrupole magnets are common) and actually focus all directions symmetrically: ...
GammaSQ's user avatar
  • 310
2 votes

How is the Rayleigh criterion connected to the Abbe limit?

Both equations are in fact structurally similar with Abbe limit given by $d= \dfrac{\lambda}{2\mathrm{NA}}$ And Rayleigh limit given by $d =1.22 \dfrac{\lambda} {2\mathrm{NA}}= 0.61\dfrac{\lambda} {\...
Paulami's user avatar
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2 votes
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How do I read a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image?

The magnification is 1,500 which is displayed at bottom of the image. If you want to know the object size from the image, there are 2 methods. How to know directly the size using SEM. In this SEM ...
Tanaike's user avatar
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2 votes
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How was microscope-level zoom created by a lens and a water droplet?

How was this amount of zoom created by the water droplets on the concave lens of my glasses? First, the typical magnification one gets from a drop of water is only a factor of ~4-5, not 10s to 100s. ...
honeste_vivere's user avatar
2 votes
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How to properly work with water-immersion microscope lenses

(I don't know anything about this but) Have you tried Olympus support http://www.olympus-lifescience.com/en/contact-us/ You may have to tel the computer you need a repair/service, but I'm sure the ...
JMLCarter's user avatar
  • 4,462
2 votes

Microscopic view of corneal surface from eyeglass glint - how does it work?

I suspect that you are getting a focused image of objects that are normally out of focus because of the point like nature of the light source. The spatial coherence of the light means that you can ...
Floris's user avatar
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2 votes
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Ray diagram of focussing on a compound microscope

The eye will see a sharp final image as long as the final image is between infinity (real image in focal plane of eyepiece) and the near point (25 cm) of the eye (real image between $F_{\rm e}$ and ...
Farcher's user avatar
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2 votes

Why don't we have proton/neutron microscopes?

I don't know how pertinent is my answer, but actually they should have gone much farther, as FIBs (Focused Ion Beam) microscope use heavier atoms (usually Gallium). However, I'm not sure that they ...
Massimo Valerio Preite's user avatar

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