39 votes
Accepted

What is this sort of abstract rainbow?

This is not a "rainbow". Quoting from the linked site, "not all colored patches in the sky are rainbows". It instead is a circumhorizon arc. Rainbows are caused by internal by refraction and ...
David Hammen's user avatar
  • 41.3k
38 votes

If I'm traveling at the same direction and speed of the wind, will I still hear and feel it?

Theoretically no you wouldn't hear or feel anything but obviously in reality not all of the wind is going the exact same direction and speed.
Yogi DMT's user avatar
  • 1,657
23 votes
Accepted

Why does moderately distant lightning sound the way it does: relatively quiet high pitched thunder first, and then much louder low pitched thunder?

I'm not an expert, but I spent some time with references 1 and 2 several years ago. This answer is based on some notes I took. Measurements using the radio waves produced by lightning indicate that ...
Chiral Anomaly's user avatar
20 votes

Rainbow in cloud near Sun

There is a full display of these that can occur. The picture here illustrates one of these The names given to the parts of this are seen below. This is a St. Petersburg display. I first saw one 25 ...
Lawrence B. Crowell's user avatar
20 votes

Why do rain droplets differ so "much" in size?

The size of a rain drop depends on the process of formation. In principle, condensation of moist air at high altitudes causes tiny drops to form. As soon as those drops get big enough, they start to ...
Floris's user avatar
  • 119k
19 votes

If I'm traveling at the same direction and speed of the wind, will I still hear and feel it?

To really test the hypothesis, you should ride a balloon: it has no connection to the ground, there is no effect that will make it go slower or faster than the wind. I hear it is a really calm ...
toolforger's user avatar
16 votes

What is this sort of abstract rainbow?

that type of rainbow is created by light refraction within an extended cloud or layer of ice crystals, in which the crystals are similarly-shaped and have been aligned by wind shear so their principal ...
niels nielsen's user avatar
14 votes

Does a tower bell ringing prevent thunderstorms?

There is enormous energy in a storm, which will be randomly oriented with respect to a bell tower. The energy in the bell's sound will be radially falling with $1/r^2$ and is not directional. The ...
anna v's user avatar
  • 233k
12 votes

If I'm traveling at the same direction and speed of the wind, will I still hear and feel it?

Hypothetically, if you were on a flat plain with constant wind speed, and riding at wind speed, the only noises you'd hear are road noise from the chain, tires, gears and engine. Normally, however, ...
MichaelS's user avatar
  • 2,193
10 votes

What is the explanation of the glory (optical phenomenon)?

First thing to know is that either the object projecting the shadow or the shadow itself have nothing to do with the formation of the effect. As we shall see below, the fact that the shadow is always ...
Diracology's user avatar
  • 17.7k
10 votes

What is the explanation of the glory (optical phenomenon)?

Sir Michael Berry seem to suggest that the explanation is now complete in section 6 of this paper: Nature’s optics and our understanding of light published in 2015 in the journal of Contemporary ...
The Question's user avatar
10 votes

Can we theoretically guide cold air from high altitude down to the needy cities as free AC?

Believe it or not, the air at the bottom of the tube would be just as hot at the air at the same height outside the tube. In air that's well mixed, the temperature decreases as you go up at a rate ...
Ben51's user avatar
  • 9,684
9 votes

Why is the sky never green? It can be blue or orange, and green is in between!

I scrolled through the answers expecting to find at least one with a chromaticity diagram, but there are none, so I'm writing my own. Short answer: it simply isn't true that colors are arranged in a ...
benrg's user avatar
  • 26k
8 votes

Rainbow in cloud near Sun

That will be a sun dog. I saw one last week. (The sun is over on the left in this picture.)
Chris Degnen's user avatar
8 votes

Why do rain droplets differ so "much" in size?

According to a French researcher, raindrops differ in size because of topological changes they undergo as they fall. They start out spherical when they first form within clouds. Surface tension ...
Ernie's user avatar
  • 8,518
7 votes

Why does moderately distant lightning sound the way it does: relatively quiet high pitched thunder first, and then much louder low pitched thunder?

Air is not a dispersive medium for sound waves. At least, in normal condition. When a lightning is produced, the air is heated up to a very high temperature, creating a shock wave like. The sound ...
Mark_Bell's user avatar
  • 886
7 votes
Accepted

Is the downforce of rain on airplanes negligible?

The impact of new drops even in heavy rain has only a small effect. From force x time = change in momentum $$F\times 1 = 0.021 \times 10^{-3}\times 1000\times 9$$ where the 1000 is for the density of ...
John Hunter's user avatar
  • 13.7k
7 votes
Accepted

Does a tower bell ringing prevent thunderstorms?

The question whether ringing a bell on a tower can influence lightning strikes involves two aspects: hypothesizing physical processes which might be relevant, and then figuring out (or measuring) ...
Andrew Steane's user avatar
6 votes

What is the explanation for the elevated levels of iodine-131 near Vermont shown in this video?

Notice that the boundary of the high-fallout region in Idaho, Colorado, Oklahoma, and Illinois is blotchy and blobby and goes gradually from the red through green to blue. However, there is a ...
rob's user avatar
  • 88.6k
6 votes

Why does moderately distant lightning sound the way it does: relatively quiet high pitched thunder first, and then much louder low pitched thunder?

Although I am not a thunderstorm expert either, my guess would be, that the reflections of the soundwaves between the atmosphere/clouds and/or ground are responsible for the delay of the low ...
oliver's user avatar
  • 7,442
5 votes

If I'm traveling at the same direction and speed of the wind, will I still hear and feel it?

If your ears moves continuously as per the wind the relative speed will be zero , and you wont hear it. But this case is ideal but not practical. In reality, your movements wont be as smooth as ...
xhan0o's user avatar
  • 51
5 votes

Is angular momentum conserved on a spinning sphere, specifically Earth

Let me first introduce a name. The physics of the motions of the atmosphere and the oceans is referred to as 'geophysical fluid dynamics'. (The physics of the motions of the atmosphere's air can to a ...
Cleonis's user avatar
  • 20.5k
4 votes

Why does lightning most often occur at night?

To add some foundation to the day/night consideration for when lightning is most often seen, here is a plot from Global electric circuit implications of combined aircraft storm electric current ...
JeopardyTempest's user avatar
4 votes

If I'm traveling at the same direction and speed of the wind, will I still hear and feel it?

Yes you would and no, you never do. You never hear the wind per se, you hear only its interactions with physical objects. If you're moving in perfect unison with it, it is not interacting with you ...
John's user avatar
  • 141
4 votes

If I'm traveling at the same direction and speed of the wind, will I still hear and feel it?

When sailing against the wind, you feel it as much stronger because the true wind (wind you'd feel when standing still) and the wind caused because of your own motion will be added. When sailing ...
mileippert's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Do in our atmosphere at least two positions exist where there is no wind?

You are right that the degree of freedom in the altitude / height in the atmosphere does not change things greatly for the implications of the hairy ball theorem for meteorology. All you need to do is ...
Selene Routley's user avatar
4 votes

Do forests create wind?

Trees releasing moisture into the air will have a cooling effect on the air. If the forest is large enough, this may cause a temperature (and pressure) difference between the air above it, and above a ...
joseph h's user avatar
  • 29.2k
3 votes

How is 'Fog' in summer (sea-elevation) possible?

Water boils at $100 ^\circ~\mathrm C$. $30$-$45^\circ~ \mathrm{C}$ is not nearly enough to boil water, but the constant heat of the sun is enough to evaporate water over time. It takes about $4.314~\...
Haru Fujimura's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why is it always foggy on new years eve?

Because of the extensive fireworks on new years eve a wide variety of particles enter the lower part of the atmosphere (boundary layer). Among those are trace gases but also black carbon [1]. Black ...
Bollehenk's user avatar
  • 146

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