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13 votes

Why is intensity additive?

In a similar question, the good answer https://physics.stackexchange.com/a/714653/219989 shows a calculation of how when you have N sound waves with identical frequency - but uniformly distributed ...
Nadav Har'El's user avatar
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12 votes

Why interference is happening with two slits but diffraction is happening with one slit?

"Diffraction" and "interference" draw our attention to different aspects of the way waves propagate in space. Underlying both words is the same thing: just waves propagating. When ...
Andrew Steane's user avatar
8 votes

Double slit experiment with polychromatic light

Interference between different frequencies between the source and the screen doesn't matter because light propagation is linear. You can compute the fields at the screen for each frequency separately ...
benrg's user avatar
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7 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

You need to look first at the case with only one slit. There you will find that not just one spot is illuminated (straight behind the slit) but that you get diffraction [Fraunhofer diffraction ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
7 votes

Double slit experiment with polychromatic light

It should not be ignored. Presence of multiple frequencies will definitely lead to blurring of the pattern. You can see that if you do the experiment with incandescent light instead of LED or laser ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Double slit experiment with polychromatic light

When talking about the Intensity of monochromatic light one usually argues with waves of the form $\exp(ik\rho)$, $\rho$ beeing the distance to the corresponding slit. Letting them interfere on a far ...
Zaph's user avatar
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6 votes

Why is intensity additive?

The conceptual reason is that different sources have uncorrelated phases, so that at each frequency, they will randomly either add or subtract from the sound pressure. Adding these sources together is ...
Sten's user avatar
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4 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

It is often said that particles are sometimes particles and sometimes waves. This is one source of confusion. They are sort of like particles and sort of like waves. They are really like nothing ...
mmesser314's user avatar
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4 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations? It does. If it’s a particle. Classical physics predicts that if you are firing ...
Dale M's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Question on Babinet's principle example

You are too optimistic about the possibilities. With Babinet's principe you can only replace a mask by its inverse. So where it is transparent it becomes blocking and vice versa. If you have a mask ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
4 votes

Why interference is happening with two slits but diffraction is happening with one slit?

Each slit spreads light out to produce what is called a diffraction pattern and the light from each of the diffraction patterns overlap which results in an interference pattern. Usually the separation ...
Farcher's user avatar
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3 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

The entire experiment can be performed with molecules of buckminsterfullerene. I was also very surprised when I found out even such large molecules where presenting quantum effects and could be ...
Chris Ze Third's user avatar
3 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

But this is not about light. You can say that. But our experiments show that for certain setups we cannot ignore the wavelike behavior of small masses, exactly the same as we can't ignore the ...
BowlOfRed's user avatar
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3 votes

Why interference is happening with two slits but diffraction is happening with one slit?

Diffraction happens in either case. Diffraction in the two-slit case is what makes interference possible. If there was no diffraction, then all you would see on the screen would be one sharply defined ...
Ohm's Lawman's user avatar
2 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

A very common misunderstanding of the quantum double-slit experiment is that if you arrange for each particle to go through one slit (e.g. by putting a detector at one or both slits) then you will get ...
benrg's user avatar
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2 votes

Why does classical physics not predict particles in the double-slit experiment to land in just two different locations?

This is indeed one of the experiments that led to the development of quantum mechanics. The depiction of the video is misleading as electrons simply cannot be pictured as point particles "moving&...
Vincent Thacker's user avatar
2 votes

Double slit experiment with polychromatic light

When different frequencies are producing interference pattern , different frequencies interfere with each other. If the frequencies are different the interference pattern is not stationary with the ...
Farcher's user avatar
  • 96.8k
2 votes

Why interference is happening with two slits but diffraction is happening with one slit?

In accordance with @Ohm's Lawman's answer: the premise of your question is wrong: it's too general. Using units in which $\lambda=1$, diffraction happens when the slit width ($w$) satisfies: $$ w \ll ...
JEB's user avatar
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2 votes

Mach-Zehnder interferometer and superposition

Since QM is probabilistic, you can only know probability until a measurement is performed. Your doubt can be referred to a "1-input" beam-splitter since you're dealing only the branches, ...
basics's user avatar
  • 9,010
1 vote

Mach-Zehnder interferometer and superposition

Ever since Schrodinger derived the wave function for electrons academics have been trying to apply the theory to photons as well ... it leads to a lot of irrational conclusions. Dirac, Feynman and ...
PhysicsDave's user avatar
  • 2,633
1 vote
Accepted

Mach-Zehnder interferometer and superposition

The answer people give to this question depends on what interpretation of quantum theory they use. Advocates of the Copenhagen and statistical interpretations will say you can talk about what ...
alanf's user avatar
  • 8,091
1 vote

Observation in Young's double slit experiment

You can dim a laser beam until you find that light is only detected in chunks if you have a very sensitive detector. Those chunks are called photons. You can arrange a double or single slit experiment ...
alanf's user avatar
  • 8,091
1 vote

Observation in Young's double slit experiment

Photons always have both particle and wave properties just like we have arms and legs. When we are observed walking we see the leg properties, when we are waving we see the arm properties. For the ...
PhysicsDave's user avatar
  • 2,633
1 vote

Impact of obstacles on Single/ Double split interference pattern

Judging from your picture, there will be almost no influence. But such a picture usually does not show all necessary components of the wave. For sound waves, for instance, the colors might represent ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar

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