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1

I think that what is implicitly assumed here is that the machine somehow magically projects a black hole a certain distance away and that it will now start exerting gravity on the machine. But that assumes the mass comes from nothing. Mass-energy and momentum are locally conserved in general relativity. So your machine needs to contain the mass-energy to ...


0

Or to put the point differently is gravitational collapse (whether or not into a blackhole) slowed ever so slightly by a Hawking radiation style effect? Gravitational collapse certainly emits gravitational waves, by the form of the equations. Now when considering quantum mechanical effects, one has to assume a quantization of gravity with its consequent ...


3

Matter and antimatter isn't created one at a time at random. To fix your simulation, you'd need to always create an electron at the same time you create a positron. Does adding a black hole break that symmetry? Definitely not. Charge is still conserved - the positron that "falls" into the black hole doesn't just disappear - it alters the charge, angular ...


30

Locality The random walk would be expected to create different (opposing) asymetries in different regions, including regions that are distant enough to not affect each other. If this would be the main cause of asymetry, then we'd expect it to cause a predominance of matter in some areas of the observable universe and a predominance of antimatter in other ...


76

Congratulations on finding a method for baryogenesis that works! Indeed, it's true that if you have a bunch of black holes, then by random chance you'll get an imbalance. And this imbalance will remain even after the black holes evaporate, because the result of the evaporation doesn't depend on the overall baryon number that went into the black hole. Black ...


20

Your simulation randomly creates a single particle that is either type 1 or type 2. If these two types are charged, then either of these two creation processes violates conservation of charge. Charge conservation is an absolute law of physics as far as we know, and this includes processes like the formation and evaporation of black holes. The OP clarified ...


2

Is there a simple explanation for the factor 2? Yes. This is a consequence of a purely mathematical fact called Euler's homogeneous function theorem. For (nonrotating and uncharged) black holes the first law of black hole mechanics could be written as $$ dM = T dA, $$ But since the mass $M$ of a black hole is a homogeneous function of degree $\frac 12 $ in ...


1

Hawking radiation is theorized through the mathematical formalism of Quantum Field theory in Curved spacetime. What is interesting about Hawking radiation is that it's a kinematic effect of General Relativity, not a dynamical one. This means that you don't need to have a full theory of a back-reacting quantum field and Einstein's Equations to derive Hawking ...


-1

This is a diagram of space and time. Radial distance increases from left to right Time goes from bottom to top. The future timelike infinity is i+ As pointed out in the comments this already shows the evolution of the distribution of matter from past to future infinity. There is no need to use multiple diagrams. That Penrose diagram does not represent an ...


1

If the coefficient is zero, then both observers will count the same number of particles. An example of this is an unaccelerated observer in Minkowski space-time. But in a general curved space-time the coefficient is not equal to zero.


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