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GR predicts accelerated expansion of spacetime should create gravitational wave, how? How are gravitational waves generated? Gravitational waves are disturbances in the curvature of spacetime, generated by accelerated masses, that propagate as waves outward from their source at the speed of light. .... Gravitational waves transport energy as ...


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This question was answered here for the case where LIGO was boosted in the same direction the GW was travelling. In this case, the chirp's strain amplitude remains the same but the chirp is stretched in time (redshifted) if LIGO is moving away from the source or compressed (blueshifted) if LIGO is moving toward the source. If LIGO is boosted transverse to ...


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Light is not "caught by gravitational waves", so the fact that these propagate at $c$ is not relevant. Black holes are not gravitational waves. It is also unclear what is meant by the "strength of the photon field". The frequency of the light is not relevant to the capture.


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Changes in gravitational field will propagate at the speed of light, but a gravitational field itself doesn't have a "speed", rather, it just exists. Using the rubber sheet analogy of spacetime, you could put a heavy mass on the sheet and watch the dimple propagate away from the mass. But once everything has reached steady state, the dimple is there, and ...


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Lets get things straight. Gravity waves travel at the speed of Light waves. Gravity waves are different than gravitational waves. It is gravitational waves you must mean. Gravitational waves They are disturbances in the curvature of spacetime, generated by accelerated masses, that propagate as waves outward from their source at the speed of light. ...


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This is because gravitational waves are massless. Special relativity states that massless matter moves at $c$ in vacuum.


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Let us first make the terms clear, the overall binary coalescence is conventionally divided into an inspiral, merger, and ringdown phase as illustrated below: (Taken from the Sounds of Spacetime website, which is worth checking out on its own) The inspiral phase is when the two black holes are in a tightening quasi-stable orbit about each other. The merger ...


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The ringdown is simply the black hole formed in the merger settling down to a final stationary form. According to the no-hair theorem, this stationary form has to be described by the Kerr family of metrics described by the mass and angular momentum of the final black hole (since the intitial system is assumed to be electrically neutral). The characteristic ...


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The dimensionless amplitude of a gravitational wave (known as "the strain") is given approximately by $$ h \sim \frac{2G}{rc^4}\ddot{Q}, $$ where $\ddot{Q}$ is the second derivative of the mass quadrupole moment and $r$ is the distance to the potential source of gravitational waves. It is this strain amplitude that is detected by a gravitational wave ...


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Strictly speaking gravitational waves are a subset of gravitational radiation. Gravitational radiation could in principle be radiated as solitons, and while these can be constructed from gravitational waves by Fourier synthesis we wouldn't normally describe them as a gravitational wave. However this is a somewhat trifling objection and for all practical ...


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Just as electromagnetic radiation and electromagnetic waves are the same thing, gravitational radiation and gravitational waves are the same thing. Both kinds of radiation/waves transport energy, momentum, and angular momentum. In a quantum-mechanical treatment, both consist of massless particles (photons and graviton).


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Studying General Relativity (GR) one learns that what we call gravity is space time distortions due to the energy and momentum vector carried by massive objects. It is describe by specific tensors connecting energy momentum with space time curvature.. This is a classical physics system. It can be mathematically shown within GR that time varying ...


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The principle of equivalence is not about extended measurements across space. For example, the gravity around a planet is different from acceleration: it’s different in different places, exhibits tidal effects, etc. Gravitational waves cannot be detected at a point. They only can be detected via extended measurements. So they don’t really have anything to ...


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Yes, the Principle of Equivalence still holds true. Actually, the question incorrectly presumes that Gravitational Waves and Gravitational Field are one and the same thing, while they aren't, as is clear from the answers to the below Quora question: Quora: What is the difference between Gravitational Field and Gravitational Waves? Reading answers above, ...


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From a "Newtonian" point of view, yes. However, one should keep in mind that the full theory from which they're derived - general relativity - doesn't feature "gravitational 'acceleration'" as a true "acceleration": that's the whole point, so from that point of view, the answer is no, because there is no such thing as "gravitational acceleration" to begin ...


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