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Changing the frequency of the tuning forks

I see that mike1994 answered this question and then deleted his answer. Not sure why. He was right. "If you want to increase the frequency of vibration of a tuning fork removing some material ...
mmesser314's user avatar
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Phase-Based Ranging

The local oscillator oscillates. It does not see input nor output signals at all. It just generates a steady waveform. Your use of input and output feel unusual to me. You talk about "...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
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Intuitive explanation of Nyquist rate?

Try to draw a sampled signal, there might be interesting cases: first of all, a sampling with the same frequency of a signal (you get a DC in principle). Then you increase sampling rate a bit, you ...
Pierre Polovodov's user avatar
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Is this a good use of the convolution?

If you know the device transfer function- $T(\omega)$ or an impulse response - $h(t)$, the output signal is $$s_{out}(t) = h(t)\otimes s_{in}$$ in frequency domain $\hat{s}_{out} (\omega) = \hat{s}_{...
Pierre Polovodov's user avatar
-2 votes

Acoustic Levitation Calculations

I do not think acoustic levitation is able to lift something of this weight as it can only lift around a few milligrams and you would have to increase the wavelength which has been a roadblock. I don'...
user402659's user avatar
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Why are angular frequencies $\omega=2\pi f$ used over normal frequencies $f$?

Roughly speaking because in geometry/angular kinematics we operate in angles and there are $2 \pi \approx 6.3 ~\text {radians}$ in full turn, so : $$\theta = \theta_0 + 2 \pi f t.$$ It's just nicer to ...
Agnius Vasiliauskas's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Angular frequency vector, when explaining the motion of a wave

Sure, it's uncommon and I don't think I've seen it, but it is possible. The $k$-vector arises when you look at Fourier transforms of 2- or 3D data. For example, let $\phi(x,y)$ be some field that ...
AccidentalTaylorExpansion's user avatar
4 votes

Angular frequency vector, when explaining the motion of a wave

Yes, there is. Angular frequency $\omega$ is the magnitude of the pseudovector angular velocity $\boldsymbol{\omega}$. Its direction is normal to the plane of rotation. The sense is determined ...
Riley Scott Jacob's user avatar
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Question about fundamental frequencies

To add to John Hunter's correct answer, I'd like to add the justification for why harmonics behave so. It's entirely because of the constraints. Fixing the string at both ends means that the ...
Cort Ammon's user avatar
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