3

So how can we calculate the speed of light for different frequency? It depends on how much prior information you want to require of your calculation. In the simplest case you may just look up an approximate formula for the speed of light in your medium of choice as a function of wavelength or (less common) frequency. Of course, this relies on somebody ...


3

This question can be reformulated as: “Does the index of refraction of a given medium depend on wavelength” (inverse of frequency), the answer is given by Cauchy’s formula: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refractive_index


3

The propagation speed does not depend on the length of a string, just on its tension $T$ and linear density of mass $\mu$, in the following way $$v=\sqrt{\frac{T}{\mu}}.$$ However, if you have two strings of the same mass and different lengths, the speed of propagation will be higher in the longer one, since its linear density of mass will be lower.


3

Human hearing is not really limited by the Nyquist sampling theorem, since we do not reconstruct the sound signal in the brain like it assumes. So the enhancement an implant can give is not due to frequency range. The theorem shows what signals can be perfectly reconstructed from bandwidth-limited measurements, but the goal of hearing is extracting useful ...


3

HINT: Sound waves in an organ pipe are examples of standing waves. The allowed wavelengths of a standing wave on (for example) a string are not arbitrary, but are instead determined by the length of the string.


2

The above answer is correct. The speed is not dependent on the length. But it will take longer, because it is traveling a longer distance.


2

Different pairs of notes on the piano (or any other instrument) will produce more, or less, of a noticeable beat effect depending on the musical interval the register (low or high) the timbre (sound quality) of the instrument the intonation used (fine-tuning of notes relative to each other - it's not always exactly matching the theory) Each note on a piano ...


2

Shouldn't an input force cycle of a low magnitude (say, one person walking) at the resonant frequency (1Hz) be sufficient to cause resonance and near-catastrophic swaying? Only if the damping in the system is less than some threshold. One person walking will indeed send some energy into the system. But the motion of the bridge will be damped by the ...


1

A standing wave doesn't necessarily travel with less frequency on a longer string, as the string tension and string density affect wave speed, as stated by AFG with the formula: $v=\sqrt{\frac{T}{\mu}} \qquad \qquad(1)$ where $T$ is the tension in the string and $\mu$ is the linear density of the string. The velocity of waves on the string is also given by ...


1

The frequency needed to produce a resonant standing wave on a string fixed at the far end will depend on the length of the string. You will need an integer number of anti-nodes in the pattern.


1

The wavelength is independent of temperature. You can see here that the wavelength depends only on the length of the organ pipe and the harmonic of the resonance, rather than the temperature of the gas itself. The only way of changing the wavelength is by increasing the harmonic or the length of the pipe itself. Hope this helps answer your question.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible