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The paper Sugawara, H., Hagura, H., & Sanami, T. (2003). Destruction of Nuclear Bombs Using Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Beam. arXiv preprint hep-ph/0305062 analyses this, in my opinion overly optimistically. The basic idea is to generate muons that are allowed to decay into tight neutrino beams (plus, of course other particles that will heat up some ...


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The researchers suggest sending a neutrino beam with an energy of 1000 TeV through the Earth to wherever the nuclear weapon was located (see figure). The beam would produce neutrons in a ‘hadron shower’ and would cause fission reactions in the plutonium or uranium in the bomb. These reactions would either melt or vaporize the bomb. It is complete science ...


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Slow or fast, it is a matter of the relevant time scale used for comparison. It is not the human time scale that should be used, but the microscopic time scale associated with every thermodynamic system's dynamics. On the human time scale, waiting for water boiling may seem slow, while the freezing of a bottle of supercooled water, or an explosion, may look ...


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I think you would get better appreciation of your question on Chemistry SE because chemists usually have a lot of first hand experience with slow thermodynamic processes (although there are also many reactions that are fast, of course). As far as I understand you, the processes you mean are all somehow related to diffusion/heat conduction. Why is diffusion ...


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So out of curiosity, I decided to go through some more fundamental models and their reasonable simplifications in deriving the principle behind Earth's rotational axis' precession. If you want, read on. Otherwise, you can see a final formula at the end. The long-time averaged precession can be interpreted as the result of the averaged toques that the Sun and ...


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This is a question about anthropogenic heat flux aka waste heat relative to anthropogenic global warming. According to Mark Flanner "Integrating anthropogenic heat flux with global climate models" 2009 - Although AHF exceeds 100 W m−2 in urban centers [Oke, 1988; Ichinose et al., 1999] and is treated in some urban- and meso-scale models [e.g., ...


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First some general remarks: In real life astronomy it is the moment of inertia that is known to the least level of precision. Celestial bodies don't have a uniform density. If the goal is to calculate the moment of inertia taking the the density as a function of distance-to-the-center into account, then you need those density data. In real life astronomy: ...


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It depends on too many factors to give a precise result. How much insolation is the pool receiving? Insolation is the number of watts per square meter received by the surface area of the pool. This will vary depending on the time of day, weather conditions, and the elevation of the sun in the sky (which itself depends on the pool's latitude and the time ...


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I think you should do quadratic air resistance because typical football velocities involve turbulent flow.


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According to this Wikipedia article, the pressure in the center of the earth ranges from about $330$ to $360$ gigapascals ($10^9 \, \rm{Pa}$). Using Newtonian mechanics, the order of magnitude of this value can be obtained. The pressure due to the gravitational force of the Earth in the center of the earth can be calculated through the definition of the ...


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The pressure at a point near the centre of the earth depends on the weight of matter above, and that depends on the mass and radius of the earth. The best way to get an estimate is from dimensional analysis $P=\frac{F}{A}$, where $F$ is a force and $A$ is an area, The only sensible formula that has the right dimensions is $$\frac{GM^2}{R^4}$$ To check it's ...


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The precession of the earth's tilt is caused primarily by the torque from the moon pulling on the equatorial bulge (with periodic help from the sun). The pull of each is stronger on the near side bulge. The torque varies throughout a month and year and will be strongest when the earth has its maximum tilt toward the moon and sun. This gets complicated ...


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