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Both quarks and electrons are part of the Standard Model, our currently accepted theory, and both of these are elementary particles. Entanglement (QM) is a physical phenomenon, that occurs when pairs or groups of particles are generated, interact or share spatial proximity in a way that the quantum state of each particle cannot be described independently ...


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Quantum mechanics is a particle theory, in which objects are described as "particles" instead of "fields" as in QFT. The objects studied could be molecules or atoms, even subatomic particles, depending on the scale you choose. This is same as describing the earth as a point of mass when studying Kepler motions. Here's a link about describing quarks in QM ...


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When you start compressing ordinary matter, you first start by decreasing the space between atoms (after you have, almost mechanically, broken the bonds between molecules). This gets increasingly harder because the atoms are bouncing around and they are repelling each other, because when two atoms get close enough to each other, their electron clouds see ...


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Due to quantum effects, you can't localize an elementary particle (such as an electron) within a region smaller than half it's reduced Compton wavelength ($\hbar/2mc$) where $m$ is the particle mass, $c$ is the speed of light and $\hbar$ is the reduced Planck's constant. If you try to add more energy into the system to confine the particle in a smaller ...


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In quantum field theory, an elementary particle doesn't have one precise location and size in space. The quantum of an electron field in free space has different extent compared to the electron around a hydrogen atom, for example (i.e. it's harder to bounce an electron off a free electron than off a hydrogen atom). While in one very real way, an electron's ...


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Under special relativity nothing can be incompressible: consider any object of nonzero size and finite mass in its rest frame; when you apply a force to it on one side it will start moving. If it were completely incompressible, the other end would start moving simultaneously. Since the ends are spatially separated, there is a frame in which the other end ...


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Some elementary particles, such as the electron, are stable; others, like its more massive sibling the muon, are unstable and decay into other particles. A muon decays through the weak interaction into an electron, a muon neutrino, and a electron antineutrino, all of which are elementary. The muon’s half life is 1.56 microseconds, and this can be calculated ...


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Can we theoretically calculate half of a particle which is in complete isolation? Yes, and in fact that's generally the easier case. Neutrons, for instance, decay over about 880 seconds - but only in isolation, not within a nucleus (although the reason gets complex). In a general fashion, you can see a correspondence between the mass of the particle and ...


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I noticed your profile picture is of Albert Einstein. One of Einstein's major contributions is the concept of mass-energy equivalence. It shows that particles have intrinsic energy apart from classically considered mechanical energy. An electron has nonzero rest mass, so it follows that it has nonzero rest energy. Evidence of this can be most easily seen in ...


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