Skip to main content
3 votes
Accepted

Does cutting out the surfaces with no surface charge affect the charge distribution on the remaining parts of a conducting surface of arbitrary shape?

Removing the uncharged parts of a charge distribution would not change the field configuration elsewhere. To show this, start with the Poisson equation (assuming the permittivity $\epsilon_0$ is the ...
CompassBearer's user avatar
3 votes

Why electric field increase near the cable connected in AC 220V socket even current is zero?

The electric field depends on the potential difference (voltage) between the wires in the cable, not on the current going through the wires. The electric field will be strongest inside the cable, ...
Philip Wood's user avatar
  • 36.1k
2 votes
Accepted

Electric force is zero in a solenoid

If you do account for resistance then there will be charge accumulated on the windings to create the $E$-field associated with the (presumably small) voltage drop between the terminals, like in this ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
2 votes

Electric force is zero in a solenoid

I'll do the one dimension wire (which can be coiled or not). The length is parameterized by $x$, a Cartesian coordinate. As stated, it has a current: $$ j(x) = j_0 $$ and that means there is an ...
JEB's user avatar
  • 35.5k
2 votes

What is the net macroscopic electric field at any point inside a dielectric?

You are both right, as @basics points out. Any external electrostatic field is produced by a charge density somewhere in space. Whether you want to divide that in to two parts ($E_{ext} + E_{out}$) as ...
Jakob KS's user avatar
  • 1,786
2 votes
Accepted

Does the geometric shape of the cross-section of an infinitesimally thin conducting charged thread (wire) affect its electric field?

I assume the charge is uniformly distributed around the major radius for all these tori. You are right. Shape and conductivity make smaller and smaller differences as a torus approaches a thin ring. ...
mmesser314's user avatar
  • 41.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Electric field experienced by a charge

What we measure (with a load cell for example) is the force on charge 2. And we can test that $F \propto \frac{Q_1Q_2}{r^2}$. Then we define the electric field in the location where $Q_2$ are as: $E = ...
Claudio Saspinski's user avatar
1 vote

Electric field at a point due to dielectric inserted in between a parallel plate capacitor

The induced charges on the dielectric will attract the charges on the plates. Since the dielectric is inserted partially between the two plates, the charge on the plate near the dielectric will ...
BaddDadd's user avatar
  • 513
1 vote

Electric field at a point due to dielectric inserted in between a parallel plate capacitor

Consider the situation before the dielectric was introduced (left diagram) and after the dielectric was introduced (right diagram). There are two possible scenarios. The first is when the capacitor ...
Farcher's user avatar
  • 97.9k
1 vote

How will the capacitance of a capacitor reduce when the distance between the plates is increased?

Now I know that if the potential difference between the plates increase that capacitance will reduce Ideally, this is not the case. Capacitance depends on the geometry of the conductors, not the ...
BioPhysicist's user avatar
  • 57.2k
1 vote

Comparing Electric Potential Energy of two Charges

In the case that A and B both have the same positive charge: remember that potential energy associated with a position (it is not defined as something that requires two positions e.g. A and A') is the ...
Marius Ladegård Meyer's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible