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Calculating net phase in single slit diffraction

See here for a simple solution using phasors. Most slit experiment patterns (double, n-slit, etc.) can be easily calculated using phasors. P.S. Your solution is correct(i.e.doesn't have logical errors)...
Leo's user avatar
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Why does interference pattern remain constant?

Sammy gerbil already explained the fact that the field strength is, in fact, oscillating. I want to expand in a different direction, regarding how our senses work. You are right that at the maxima of ...
Vercassivelaunos's user avatar
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Why does interference pattern remain constant?

The common explanation that at any point there is an oscillation in amplitude is incorrect. If this were so we would not see bright and dark fringes but a bright fringe across the screen because of ...
phil342's user avatar
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Young's double slit experiment with electrons

Yes, it is valid to consider this as evidence of wave-like behavior of electrons. This can be easily seen in the following experiment: Demonstration of single‐electron buildup of an interference ...
DrChinese's user avatar
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If only one slit is observed in the Double Slit experiment, will the unobserved slit produce an interference pattern?

As far as I know, if there is only one which way detector, which can only detect electrons/photons passing through one of the slits, the interference on the slit will disappear. The same particle ...
Attila Janos Kovacs's user avatar
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What is the relationship between an electron's wave-like and particle-like qualities? Is "Electrons are waves and particles" the whole truth?

This confusion stems from old and incomplete versions of quantum mechanics. The present-day theory that nature is described by local quantum fields simply holds that electrons are described by such a ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
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What is the relationship between an electron's wave-like and particle-like qualities? Is "Electrons are waves and particles" the whole truth?

There's no occult "truth". There are, however, reproducible and predictable experiments. Experiments sensitive to wave-like properties observe waves, while experiments sensitive to particle-...
John Doty's user avatar
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1 vote
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Interference pattern of relativistic particles

Do you mean in principle or in practice? In principle the answer is "yes, even fast electrons can in principle be brought into a state with a superposition of directions of motion which would ...
Andrew Steane's user avatar
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In the double slit experiment, why doesn't the electron interact with the wall or plate with the slits and therefore act like a particle?

Even with light, you will see the photons interacting with the slit(s) / apparatus: Note the green laser everywhere that is not a screen. Those photons have left the experiment. Looking at one slit, ...
JEB's user avatar
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In the double slit experiment, why doesn't the electron interact with the wall or plate with the slits and therefore act like a particle?

In this answer I'm going to assume quantum mechanical equations of motion actually describe reality. If a quantum system is evolving without interacting with other systems to a good approximation, ...
alanf's user avatar
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1 vote
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How is the interference pattern of the double slit experiment quantitatively measured?

For light, usually we use some sort of photoelectric detector like a CCD to sense the intensity. For a radio version of the experiment, you can scan the field by moving an antenna and measure the ...
John Doty's user avatar
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Can a CCD work in time integration regime?

Sure. Clock it to flush the charge out, and then just hold the clocks static. When you're ready to end the exposure, clock out and measure the charge. The only issue is dark current: thermal electrons ...
John Doty's user avatar
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How come two electrons interfere?

Interference or diffraction are effects of the interaction of the particle with the field they pass through (see Casimer effect) and which is found in the holes, what we see on the screen: diffraction ...
The Tiler's user avatar
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