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White light (e.g. sunlight) consists of many different wavelengths of light (not only 7 btw). Each wavelength has a different diffractive index, with longer wavelengths (red) diffracting more than short wavelengths (blue). This means that for each wavelength you will get an interference pattern with a different distance between the maxima (see image) In the ...


3

It is a common misunderstanding that the double slit experiment is because you shoot electrons at the same time and they interfere. In the double slit experiment, in reality, you shoot one single electron at a time. That electron acts as a wave on the fly, and its partial waves pass both slits at the same time, and these partial waves interfere with each ...


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This is what I once did for a single slit: At the top sunlight. Below that the separate red, green and blue channels. At the red minima one sees that the total is the complementary color cyan. At the blue minima one sees yellow. At the green minima one sees magenta. For double slit, there is a nice Veritassium video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...


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The quantum-mechanical interference in the double-slit experiment happens at the slits, not at the screen where the pattern is visible. If you sent light through a double slit into a fog, the volume of the fog would be illuminated in the same way as in crepuscular rays.


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The point of (quantum) cryptography is not to just distribute a correlated random key between Alice and Bob, but to distribute a secure key, i.e. one which cannot be known to a potential attacker. Your scheme falls short in that regard: Nothing would prevent an attacker (who would substitute the photon source) to send photons prepared in such a way that ...


1

The protons and electrons will attract one another by the standard Coulomb force, and this will modify the interference patterns of both types of particle. However a proton wave does not interfere with an electron wave in the sense of wave interference known as superposition. The mathematics of this involves the apparatus of quantum mechanics, which I guess ...


1

The root of this confusion is the visualization that is very commonly given to explain wave particle duality. When we say that particles behave like waves, we do not mean that in the sense of a wave in a puddle. In quantum mechanics (and field theory), we say we have an electron wavefunction (in QFT, we say we have an electron wave). This wavefunction, when ...


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The whole purpose of the setup is to erase the path information of electron. If a detector is put at the slits, it would mean we have the path information and the electrons would behave like matter particles. I would say watch the first 2 minutes of the video link that you shared. It would not matter if later the path information is erased because we already ...


1

In quantum physics, any functional interaction like measurement/observation forces particles down to a single state. The Schrodinger equation doesn't predict that a particle will end up in a single state. There are theories that modify quantum mechanics so that a particle will end up in a single state, such as spontaneous collapse theories: https://arxiv....


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The text of your question implies that you have misunderstood the theoretical description of the Young's slits experiment. In the interference here, it is not two different electrons whose wavefunctions interfere, but two parts of the wavefuntion of each individual electron. Of course in practice many electrons may pass through the system, but each ...


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