New answers tagged

0

You have almost got it. At first I want to notice that not all molecules has electric dipole moment, only those which have a distance between gravity centers of positive and negative charges greater than zero. Thus molecules which has mirror symmetry, doesn't have a dipole moment. Second, for di-atom molecules in place of dipole length you can plug a ...


0

A dipole is the name given to a specific term in the multipole expansion of a field. In this case we are speaking about an electric field generated by several charges. In principle for isolated charges, the leading (and only) term is the monopole term, however for configurations whose total charge is 0, the monopole term vanishes and the dipole term starts ...


1

take advantage of the fact that $\vec p$ is a vector. Resolve $\vec p$ into two components - $\vec p_1$ and $\vec p_2$ one along the line joining charge $q$ and the centre of dipole and one perpendicular to it (ref fig 1). the Electric field at an axial point of dipole : $\vec E_{axial}= \frac{1}{4\pi\epsilon_0}\frac{2p_2}{r^3}$ Electric Field along the ...


0

Think of a “finite-size dipole” as a positive charge at the tip of the $\mathbf p$ vector and an equal negative charge at the tail. The forces exerted by $q$ on these two charges will not be exactly equal and opposite, because the field of $q$ isn’t uniform and the two charges aren’t at the same point. Draw the two force vectors and add them to get the net ...


0

The electric potential must be constant inside of a non-driven conductor. This means that the resultant E field in the conductor (from the dipole and the shifted electrons in the sphere) must be zero. Place a Gaussian surface just outside (or inside) of the sphere.


0

The topic under discussion here is plasma resonance in a cylindrical structure. The geometry here is cylindrical. The exciting field is perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder, and the polarization is also perpendicular to the cylinder. He is saying that the dipole moment that the field induces can be considered to live on the axis ... hence a "dipolar ...


1

It has to do with the structure of the material. Polarization, or polarization density, has to do with the size of dipole moments you can have in your material. The manner in which dipole moments are created depends on the material. In the example of water, each water molecule has it's own dipole moment. Macroscopically, they may form a net polarization if ...


1

The most important factor for getting a large polarization in a solid is how close the material is to a distorted crystal structure which breaks inversion symmetry (e.g., a ferroelectric or piezoelectric instability). The closer a material is to being a ferroelectric etc., the larger the polarization because it is easier for the external electric field to ...


Top 50 recent answers are included