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1 mol is defined as Avogadro's number $6.022\cdot10^{23}$ and you could count anything using moles. We could count some events happening in a fixed time, for example water molecules flowing through a pipe. If we divide the total count of those molecules by elapsed time we get rate of flow which in this case would measured in $\frac{mol}{s}$. If we wanted to ...


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We are talking about chiral invariance, right? First of all, the mass term $$ m\bar{\psi} \psi $$ breaks the chiral symmetry. So if your professor demands chiral invariance, then we are dealing with massless QED. For massless QED, you can add a chiral symmetric mass dimension 6 term like (NJL 4-fermion interaction) $$ \Delta \mathcal{L} = g (\bar{\psi}\psi ...


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In the SI system of units, angles are dimensionless. There is a system of units where the radian is a distinct base unit and the steradian is an actual derived unit. See https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC61354/.


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I can't access the original papers, but usually, these formulas were obtained by something like a linear regression in a log-log scale, i.e., the logarithm of the body surface area $b = \log_{10} BSA$ is obtained as a linear function of the logarithm of weight $w = \log_{10} W$ and the logarithm of height $h = \log_{10} H$. So, they have obtained the ...


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This is a great example of how checking units and dimensionality help us understand the physics. If you apply a discrete set of voltages with different frequencies, each with amplitude $a_i$, that is $$f(t) = \sum_i a_i e^{i\omega_i t}$$ then the dimensions of $a_i$ are voltage and you will get it from the discrete Fourier transform, which has the ...


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As others have stated, there is no common word for your quantity. As Rob Jeffries pointed out, it does have units of flux, but what you're describing is not a flux. I can, however, give you some intuition about the quantity. This is just one way of thinking about it: You mentioned that you're getting this term from the Lorentz force law for a test wire in a ...


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The units of H-field (magnetic field strength, or magnetic field intensity) are A/m. So Ampere metres could represent a flux of H-field. Unlike the B-field, there can be "sources" and "sinks" of H (we call them magnetic poles), and so the total H-field flux into or out of a closed volume can be positive or negative, but would be zero in vacuum. I'm not ...


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Such a quantity does not have a commonly-used name. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SI_derived_unit


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