7 votes
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Can you have diffraction without a slit, simply by reducing the size of light source?

In case you have in mind a point-source, then - no. By definition of diffraction (you can check it in wiki) it's light bending around obstacles corners or aperture. By definition, point-source of ...
Agnius Vasiliauskas's user avatar
4 votes

Can you have diffraction without a slit, simply by reducing the size of light source?

All objects diffract and diffraction is light's interaction with obstacles, specifically with their edges. The reason we see the effect more pronounced with smaller slits/openings is because the ...
hyportnex's user avatar
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3 votes
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Why do shadows from the sun join each other when near enough?

Unfortunately, all of the highly upvoted answers to this question are wrong. One of them says that it's a diffraction effect. It's actually wholly explainable by geometric optics. The other two (John ...
benrg's user avatar
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1 vote
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How is the interference pattern of the double slit experiment quantitatively measured?

For light, usually we use some sort of photoelectric detector like a CCD to sense the intensity. For a radio version of the experiment, you can scan the field by moving an antenna and measure the ...
John Doty's user avatar
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1 vote

Can you have diffraction without a slit, simply by reducing the size of light source?

Let us consider some practical example. There exist microscopic lasers (https://doi.org/10.1364/OPTICA.476758), they have mirrors, so there is diffraction on a mirror.
akhmeteli's user avatar
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