5

They do indeed repel each other. But they are repelled from the point they are coming from even stronger. Imagine having two charged metal balls where one has half the charge of the other. When you connect them with a wire, will charges flow? Yes. Sure, each individual electron feels a strong repulsion from both of the balls, since there already is an ...


4

Electrons do repel each other but they also like to spread out. Quantum mechanics tells us that it costs a lot of energy to localize an electron in a small volume. These two tendencies compete. The quantum mechanical Hubbard model is based on these two effects. It has two parameters: on-site repulsion and transfer energy (transfer Hamiltonian matrix element)....


3

The drag is due to repulsion caused by eddy currents induced by the moving magnetic field in the Aluminum metal. The repulsive force opposes the motion of the metal ball according to Faraday's second law of electromagnetism. The same thing will happen if you replace the aluminum with copper metal.


3

If I take cross section close to beggining of the conductor, charges which start moving on one end don't experience as many collisions when they get to that cross section close to the beggining as they will when they come to the other end of a conductor. It seems that resistance should increase from one towards the other end of an conductor. You seem to ...


1

Inside the cavity we have placed $+q$ charge. Due to the electric field of the $+q$ charge in the cavity (radiating outwards), the free electron gets drifted towards the inside surface of cavity (opposite to the radial outward direction of positive charge in the cavity). As a result, the inside surface of cavity gets negative charge an outer surface of ...


1

Yes, there is a difference. If you made the wire as you mentioned, into a spiral, like this: then there is quite a big difference between this and a straight wire. The difference between a straight wire and a coil or spiral wire is that the spiral wire resists changes in current flow. This is called an inductor or solenoid. It resists changes in the ...


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