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7 votes
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Is the size of a black hole singularity smaller than a fundamental particle?

The very short answer to this is: We have no idea. General relativity predicts that the singularity of a Schwarzschild black hole (which I assume is what you mean by "actual black hole") is ...
paulina's user avatar
  • 1,897
6 votes

Is the size of a black hole singularity smaller than a fundamental particle?

While @paulina's answer: we don't know is correct, because quantum gravity is not understood, I'll answer for a classical Schwarzschild blackhole as described by Kip Thorne. The size is zero, however ...
JEB's user avatar
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5 votes

Is the size of a black hole singularity smaller than a fundamental particle?

We know that black hole is infinitely densed. More exactly: The theory of general relativity predicts that the center of a black hole is infinitely dense. This theory predicts very well everything ...
Thomas Fritsch's user avatar
3 votes

Can you calculate the radius of a hypothetical singular surface inside a black hole from observing changes to its linear momentum?

No, because as an observer outside the event horizon, you will never be able to see an object cross the event horizon. (See This post)
Lenard Kasselmann's user avatar
2 votes

Necessity of Singularity in General Relativity

Well the famous singularity theorems show (very very roughly speaking) that in the theory of classical GR, collapse beyond horizon implies a singularity. Classical GR is not the true theory of physics,...
Joe Schindler's user avatar
1 vote

Necessity of Singularity in General Relativity

What is it that preludes the predicted field, even at $r<r_{Schwarzschild}$, from simply terminating at the surface of a collapsar of dense matter, and taking some other form inside it? This is ...
safesphere's user avatar
  • 12.7k
1 vote

Hawking Temperature of the BTZ Black Hole

Another option for finding the Hawking temperature of the BTZ black hole is by the formalism of the surface gravity $\kappa$ which connected to the Hawking temperature via: $$T_H=\frac{\kappa}{2\pi}$$ ...
Daniel Vainshtein's user avatar

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