6

The Big Bang theory does not in itself need to focus on the distinction between matter and radiation. And the Big Bang theory is not a statement about origins in the philosophical sense. Rather it is a statement about the nature of the evolution of the universe from very early times. It holds that that evolution is one in which an initially hot dense state ...


6

The Big Bang started from a singularity -- which is to say not a physical singularity, which would be an oxymoron. A singularity means a point at which we have no mathematically valid description of physics. General relativity implies nothing at a singularity, except that we need a more comprehensive theory to say what happened. Going back as far as we can, ...


2

at the moment after the big bang, how much gravity would a person 'standing', say a metre away experience The Big Bang didn’t happen at a point, so you can’t be one meter away from it. The Big Bang model is one of a homogeneous and isotropic universe in which spacetime curvature invariants are the same at every spatial location. The curvature gets weaker ...


2

You're right that in the case of matter moving away at different velocities from a given point, any observer would be moving away from any other observer at a velocity proportional to the distance between them, i.e. Hubble's law would also be true. If this scenario were true, it would mean that our Universe wouldn't be described by general relativity (GR), ...


1

Your model works quite well in Newtonian gravity. You can even derive the Friedmann equations describing the rate of expansion of the universe from your model, and they match the equations from real cosmology, in the appropriate $c\to\infty$ limit. If you adapt your model to general relativity, you get the standard cosmological model. If you start with a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible