22 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

While the discoveries of the rules of chemistry and some current practical wisdom is empirical, it is better to think of the entire nature of chemistry as dictated by the principles of quantum ...
Matt Hanson's user avatar
  • 3,092
18 votes

Why do valence electrons not push each other away?

First of all, the electrons do exert a repulsive force on one another. This is inherently accounted for in the electrostatic repulsion terms in the atomic Hamiltonian that is used to solve the ...
Matt Hanson's user avatar
  • 3,092
11 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

atoms have 8 electron "slots" in their outer shell The shape of the periodic table is one of the great successes of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. If we approximate that we're ...
rob's user avatar
  • 89.9k
9 votes

Why do valence electrons not push each other away?

They do repel each other, but the nucleus of the atom attracts them so they keep hanging around. If you take helium, with 2 electrons, it is clear that the nucleus with charge +2 will dominate over ...
Jos Bergervoet's user avatar
6 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

"Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?" I suggest that the answer is 'no', but some people believe on a theoretical basis that we should be able to understand chemistry from ...
terry-s's user avatar
  • 296
5 votes

Why do valence electrons not push each other away?

Technically you would account for interactions between elections in multi-electron atoms, and this interaction would be repulsive, but there is no issue with there being a repulsion. This is where the ...
BioPhysicist's user avatar
  • 56.5k
4 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

No. The problem with understanding chemistry from particle physics is the quantum solutions of anything more than Hâ‚‚ simply don't exist as analytic solutions. We can grind through particle physics on ...
Joshua's user avatar
  • 1,642
4 votes

Is reflected photon the same?

at this scale how do you define original? because in the end it's just energy. a wave reflecting back or a photon reflecting back obeying their characteristic nature.
Lakshya Dubey's user avatar
3 votes

Atomic Sub-shell question

It's not as well-known as it should be that $p_x$ and $p_y$ are superpositions of the $m_l=\pm1$ orbitals. That means the $p_x$ and $p_y$ orbitals no longer have $m_l$ as a quantum number. This is ...
Dr. Nate's user avatar
  • 367
3 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

We can build much of chemistry from non-relativistic quantum mechanics (NRQM). However, the "Standard Model" is relativistic quantum field theory (RQFT); and a direct derivation would ...
The_Sympathizer's user avatar
2 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

As you can see from the wide range of answers, the answer to your question is rather philosophical, so even practicing chemists and physics do not necessarily agree on it. We believe that all chemical ...
tparker's user avatar
  • 47.5k
2 votes

Do we understand chemistry from particle physics?

Chemistry has a theoretical basis drawn from quantum mechanics, but relies on experimentation to confirm it's findings. Chemists reason about chemical properties (e.g. reactivity, oxidation states, ...
m_plus's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Atomic Sub-shell question

The shapes of atomic orbitals are related to the spherical harmonics, and their probability densities have the form $$ Y_\ell^m \propto e^{im\phi} P_\ell^m(\cos\theta) $$ Here we're describing ...
rob's user avatar
  • 89.9k
1 vote
Accepted

Dipole transitions between He states

From the NIST webpage one of the selection rules is: $\Delta M_J =0 , \pm1$, except transitions $ M_J = 0\rightarrow0$ when $\Delta J=0$ And in the described case of $P_1 \rightarrow S_1$ the $\...
Noct's user avatar
  • 668
1 vote

Atomic Sub-shell question

All the subshells have a orbital with $m_l=0$ . $m_l$ signifies orientation of orbitals. Its value lies always between $\pm l$, i.e. $-l,...,0,...l$. s only can have one orientation. (Only one $m_l$ ...
Lakshya Dubey's user avatar
1 vote

What would happen if an atomic bomb exploded on a nuclear power plant?

The increase in damage -- over and above that caused by the bomb itself -- would be dominated by the dispersion of radioactive isotopes from spent fuel stored onsite, and/or from the reactor core. ...
MarkH's user avatar
  • 49

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