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Why raindrops look like sticks?

When I look at individual frames, raindrops look like little white lines about 10 to 20 times as long as they're wide. I think that's how far they fall while one frame is being taken. Maybe some of ...
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Why raindrops look like sticks?

Small raindrops are roughly spherical. As they get larger, they flatten (see figure). Even larger raindrops are unstable, and break up: (figures from https://gpm.nasa.gov/education/articles/shape-of-...
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Why raindrops look like sticks?

It is the perception of the continuous path of the drop . Slow motion is not enough. Try using "print screen " on the video. They show up as tiny drops.
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Why raindrops look like sticks?

Your shutter speed is too slow, and you are seeing the raindrops travel within each video frame. Falling raindrops are approximately spherical. The teardrop shape sometimes occurs in droplets moving ...
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UV-absorption capability of air

It is actually kind of difficult to make good measurements in that spectral range, although with better UV sources it should be getting better. You can try to build up the absorption spectra from a ...
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If you decreased the mass of a planet, but kept the mass of the atmosphere the same, would the air density decrease?

In an isothermal atmosphere, the density is given approximately by $$\rho = \rho_0\exp(-\mu gh/k_BT)\ ,$$ where $\mu$ is the mean mass of a particle, $h$ is the height above ground level and $g$ is ...
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If you decreased the mass of a planet, but kept the mass of the atmosphere the same, would the air density decrease?

Yes the air density would decrease. The density is proportinal to $ e^{-g*h/T} $ where g is the local force of gravity h is the height and T is the tenperature. Lower gravity gives lower pressure and ...
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Snorkeling vs diving with a breathing cylinder

There is a regulator valve that ensures that the cylinders deliver air at the pressure at your current depth.
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Is it possible make a train moving with less atmospheric friction if a pressurized air shield is applied at its frontal part?

Unlikely since the density of air is already low, and the speeds are not that fast. You could try to use something like helium and have a thin layer of helium to try to reduce drag. Hard drives used ...
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