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The classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, both in the static and dynamic case. Also covers general questions about magnets, electric attraction/repulsion etc. Distinct from electrical-engineering.

3
votes
Take the interface conditions for electromagneticfields, e.g. $$ \vec n\cdot \Delta\vec D = \vec\rho_s$$ i.e. the normal component of the $\vec D$ field is continuous if no surface charge $\vec\rho_ …
answered Jul 12 '17 by Tobias Kienzler
1
vote
In general, Ohm's law $$\vec j = \sigma \vec E$$ is used, where $\sigma$ is the conductivity. In your example however, you'll use $j = I / A$ where $A$ is the cross section of the conductor, in …
answered Nov 10 '10 by Tobias Kienzler
3
votes
As KennyTM stated, use the conservation of energy. Say for example you have a constant electric field E to accelerate your particle of charge q and mass m, this will mean that the electrical energy E …
answered Nov 2 '10 by Tobias Kienzler
0
votes
Chapter VII in Kong's Electromagnetic Wave Theory contains not only the derivation of the field transformations, but also of the material parameters, the wave vector and the frequency (Doppler shift). …
answered Oct 21 '11 by Tobias Kienzler
2
votes
Stationary field or monochromatic field. Yes, basically that is the field including the $e^{i\omega t}$ term, but even when it is omitted one still knows what is meant.
answered Nov 10 '10 by Tobias Kienzler
2
votes
In linear electrodynamics (i.e. low intensities), the dielectric constant and refractive index remain unchanged. A different thing is nonlinear optics (applying to ED in general as well), for more the …
answered May 13 '11 by Tobias Kienzler
23
votes
Brief answer: Read only the bold part (and ignore grammar then). The answer you already mentioned lies in Quantum Field Theory (QFT). But to fully understand it, you must give up a particle as a poin …
answered Nov 4 '10 by Tobias Kienzler
1
vote
The work in picking up something is not done by the magnet, but by you! Were a magnet and a piece of iron in free space (i.e. vacuum and no gravity), they'd simply start approaching one another, conv …
answered Jun 13 '13 by Tobias Kienzler
6
votes
2answers
A single free charge (e.g. electron) $q$ fixed at the coordinate origin has the well-known Coulomb/electric potential $$\phi(\vec r) = \frac q{4\pi\epsilon_0}\frac 1r \tag{A}$$ where $r=|\vec r|$ of …
asked Sep 9 '15 by Tobias Kienzler
5
votes
Note that due to the time dependency of $\psi(\vec r, t)$ the retarted potential has to be considered. So we're looking for $$\begin{align*} \langle\phi(\vec r, t)\rangle &= \int_{\mathbb R^3}d^3x …
answered Sep 9 '15 by Tobias Kienzler