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Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the quantum-field-theory tag for the theory of many-body quantum-mechanical systems.

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Electromagnetic radiation is emitted and absorbed in discrete units, photons. One photon's energy is described by the well known $E = hf$ formula. Now, if you a have static electric field that doesn' …
asked Dec 23 '14 by Calmarius
1
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2answers
If you drop a coin it's affected by the air drag, bounces and tumbles on floor before it settles and you can read whether it was heads and tails. If I understood it right, the Bell's theorem says th …
asked Jan 22 '15 by Calmarius
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1answer
In an electron double slit experiment, let's put two charged plates behind the slits in an attempt to move the pattern up and down on the the screen. What will happen? Will it just shift the interfer …
asked Jul 14 '14 by Calmarius
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0answers
In the Schrödinger picture the wave function evolves and the observables stay constant. In that picture it's not too hard to imagine how does the wave function spreads interferes and diffracts, and ev …
asked Feb 14 '15 by Calmarius
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3answers
Having read Bell's theorem and proofs. It seems it builds upon the assumption that we measure identical particles. Usually these thought experiments involve giving A and B an identical scratchcard. If …
asked Jan 1 '15 by Calmarius
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2answers
As far as I know in quantum mechanics each particle have a separate normalized wave function that can be used to calculate that the particle can be found somewhere. Or more practically to determine th …
asked Dec 16 '14 by Calmarius
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1answer
So far I'm only tasting the quantum mechanics. Haven't gone very deep into the mathematics of it yet. I read about the double slit experiment, and the weird consequences of it: if you put a detector …
asked Jun 30 '14 by Calmarius
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1answer
This is a pretty basic question I think. But it's quite hard to find actual experimental results on the web (or maybe I don't know the right keywords). I'm new to quantum mechanics and want to unders …
asked Dec 7 '14 by Calmarius
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2answers
It seems you can make a beam of particles in identical state and you can perform the double slit experiment and get the fringes corresponding to the de Broglie waves of the entire system. Double slit …
asked Aug 17 '17 by Calmarius
3
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Once you measure one of the entangled photons you will know the state of the other too. For simplicity assume that the two photons are entangled in a way they have the same polarization angle. Let …
answered May 14 '15 by Calmarius
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4answers
When I first heard about the photons and the double-slit experiment my immediate thought was the following: Alright, energy is not absorbed continuously but in discrete units, photons, but nature some …
asked Jan 24 '15 by Calmarius
4
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1answer
Wikipedia says that the dispersion relation for a non-relativistic particle is: $$ \omega = \frac{\hbar k^2}{2m}. $$ But when I tried to calculate it myself, I seem to get a constant term in that fo …
asked Jan 6 '15 by Calmarius
1
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1answer
Let's say we put tracking detector (eg. a cloud chamber or a more advanced device) behind the double slits. What would we see? I think the interference pattern is three dimensional. So there are hy …
asked Nov 30 '14 by Calmarius
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In Mathematics you derive theorems from axioms and the existing theorems. In Physics you derive laws and models from existing laws, models and observations. In this case we can start from the observ …
answered Jan 11 '15 by Calmarius
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I'm trying to give a less technical answer. It's not rigorous but should give you the idea how spin and the regular rotation related. Maxwell's equations say in order to have magnetic field, you need …
answered Sep 28 '14 by Calmarius

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