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The study of large, complicated systems by means of statistics and probability theory, in order to extract average properties and to provide a connection between mechanics and thermodynamics.

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This form of the distribution function accounts for Bose-Einstein (+) or Fermi-Dirac (-) statistics. For example, in fermions, if $f_3$ or $f_4$ is occupied (that is, equals one), that means a particl …
answered Jul 30 '16 by Rococo
4
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The only trick here is getting used to how discrete sums are turned into integrals. Suppose you let energy be a function of momentum $p$ and position $q$. Then you can rewrite the discrete quantum pa …
answered May 2 '13 by Rococo
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The quantity $\hbar/k_BT$ comes up in studies of strongly correlated materials. This story is a little complicated but pretty interesting. Empirically, it has been found (1) that many strongly correla …
answered Aug 18 '15 by Rococo
3
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The minimal counterexample seems to me to be the following: Take two materials, placed next to each other: ____________________ | | | | Material|Material | | 1 | 2 | ____ …
answered Nov 21 '15 by Rococo
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Probably the best place to start classically is with integrable systems. A crude physicist definition is that these are systems that have, in the words of Nandkishore et al, "an infinite set of extens …
answered May 5 '16 by Rococo
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First of all, I don't think this is true in general. Specifically, for systems with sufficiently long-range interactions, like $V\sim r^{-d}$ or longer range, the Fermi pressure will no longer be inte …
answered Jul 18 '17 by Rococo
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More of an extended comment, but here are two thoughts: 1) I'm not sure I completely agree with the statement Textbook discussions of the Second Law of Thermodynamics (SLT) often stress that t …
answered May 30 '16 by Rococo
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If you are still around, Nathaniel, you may be interesting in this followup paper, and the summary in the same issue. In essence, the authors argue that to have a maximum energy, which is needed for n …
answered Feb 15 '14 by Rococo
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I will address this question in the specific case for a quantum mechanical system. The question of the conditions required for an interacting closed quantum system to come to equilibrium is actually …
answered May 7 '18 by Rococo
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Without intending any disrespect, I'm quite surprised that several very knowledgeable people have given a wrong, or at least incomplete, answer to this old question. For a single molecule that is in …
answered Mar 5 '17 by Rococo
4
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It might not quite fit the bill, but a recent experiment in ultracold gases out of the Greiner group does something like this. I think I already wrote about this paper for some other similar question, …
answered Jun 23 '17 by Rococo
3
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1answer
In several answers here the claim has been made that thermodynamic entropy can be regarded as energy dispersion. See, in particular here, and here and here. This is apparently the pet theory of a chem …
asked Nov 21 '15 by Rococo
10
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Preliminaries: How do we define 'localized?' For a single particle, or for multiple non-entangled particles, it is easy to tell from the expressions for the wavefunctions whether they are localized o …
answered Jul 4 '16 by Rococo
5
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Perhaps the author is thinking that $k_B$ really serves as the rate of exchange between units that we use to measure energy and those we use to measure temperature (which are different more for histor …
answered Jan 22 '16 by Rococo
0
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I am not completely sure I am understanding your question, but it looks like the basic confusion is in what limits exactly one takes in this mapping, and how the variables are rescaled. I am nearly fo …
answered Mar 13 '16 by Rococo

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