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Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

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If the problem is dealing with infinitesimal quantities try discretizing the equation. Let's assume for simplicity a constant force $F$ on an object of mass $m$, at rest for $t \le t_0$ for some $t_0 …
answered Jan 23 '15 by glS
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When you "run", i.e. contract your muscles, you use an amount of energy that was stored, in the form of chemical energy and such, in your body (see e.g. this answer on quora, or maybe look at biology. …
answered Dec 12 '15 by glS
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Think on the equilibrium position: in figure A you have a force $mg$ exerted at the lower end and an identical force pushing the opposite direction exerted by the wall (if this force didn't exist, t …
answered Jan 12 '15 by glS
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The situation you describe is more complicated than you think. If you just start climbing down the air baloon with a rope, you can't naively apply momentum conservation because there are a lot of othe …
answered Jan 23 '15 by glS
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To prove that the total energy is a constant of the motion means to prove that its total derivative with respect to time vanishes. To compute this derivative note that $$ \frac{d}{dt} v^2 \equiv \fr …
answered Mar 11 '16 by glS
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It is important to understand to which derivative you are referring to, i.e. derivative with respect to what?. For conservative systems, it is true that the force can be expressed as minus the gradie …
answered Jan 24 '15 by glS
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If the motion is uniform (no angular acceleration) you do not need any tangential force, at least ideally. It's during the acceleration that you feel the force throwing you out of the chair. Also rel …
answered Dec 3 '14 by glS
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Not easy to explain intuitively, but I'll give it a go. Let's use the following 3d model of the system at hand for reference (the Mathematica code used to make this model can be found in this gist): …
answered Jul 15 '17 by glS