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Electrostatics is concerned with the electrical fields and scalar potentials of stationary electrical charges and charge distributions. Use this for questions about electromagnetic situations in which currents and magnetic fields are absent, otherwise use [tag:electromagnetism] and/or [tag:magnetic-fields]

1
vote
The validity of setting the electrostatic potential to a certain value at a certain point comes from the fact that the electrostatic potential, like the potential, is defined up to a constant. The num …
answered Sep 6 '14 by glS
1
vote
Consider a single charge $q$ (out of a given system of charges) at a point $\textbf x$ in free space. The charge $q$ will feel electrostatic forces due to all the other charges. To analyze how $q$ wi …
answered Feb 7 '15 by glS
7
votes
The electric field lines are defined as being tangent in every point to the electric field in that point. Therefore, calling $\boldsymbol r(s)$ the "trajectory" of a field line, with $s$ a parameter …
answered Sep 5 '16 by glS
2
votes
For what concerns most calculations, the two forms are equivalent. Infact, I'd say that you could safely use the identification $$ \tag{1} \int d^3 x \rho(\textbf x) \sim \sum_i q_i,$$ in all those ci …
answered Jan 14 '15 by glS