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Particle physics is the study of the fundamental forces of nature as they are embodied in the interactions of elementary and composite particles at high energies and short time and distance scales.

5
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What you call "elementary particles" are nothing but quantum number changes of a continuos field (well, our theory models it as a continuous field). They are NUMBERS that characterize an exchange of e …
answered Dec 19 '14 by CuriousOne
0
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The actual effective collision energy of the LHC is less than the beam energy, because the machine is not really colliding the protons, but only their constituents, the quarks and gluons. Imagine you …
answered Aug 11 '14 by CuriousOne
6
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While a single LHC particle wouldn't be doing much harm, being hit by the LHC beam would be certainly deadly and it would damage the machine badly. Any dense matter that comes into the LHC beam will i …
answered Oct 1 '14 by CuriousOne
8
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One should add a word of caution with regards to gravity. Gravity does not behave like any of the other forces. It is therefor not even clear that gravity can be quantized, which is well documented in …
answered Jan 6 '15 by CuriousOne
3
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How would you define a negative energy particle? Is that one that, when it hits your detector, takes a fixed amount of energy out of it? That's trivially forbidden by the third law of thermodynamics, …
answered Sep 16 '14 by CuriousOne
1
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Particles don't do anything in QFT. It's a field theory and the entity with dynamic behavior is a field. When you think about the interaction point you have to think about a field. The Feynman diagram …
answered Jan 1 '16 by CuriousOne
1
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Quantum mechanics is uncertain, but it's not probabilistic. There are some very important differences between the two terms. In quantum mechanics nature limits our knowledge about which particular o …
answered Jan 17 '16 by CuriousOne
3
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There are no such things as particles in the physical world. The correct description of "small things" in classical mechanics is that the dynamics of the motion of the center of mass of an extended ob …
answered May 27 '15 by CuriousOne
7
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Well, if you have the time... CERN has all the technical design reports for its detectors online at http://cds.cern.ch/. They are excellent reading material. Start with a search for "ATLAS technical …
answered Aug 11 '14 by CuriousOne
3
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In one sentence? The MC track is an expression of what you think you know about how your detector works, the real track is how your detector really works. Corollary: The (statistical) difference b …
answered Aug 16 '16 by CuriousOne
1
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If electric charge is conserved, then electrons and positrons can't decay. We don't know if electric charge is conserved. The most conservative limits for the stability of the electron we seem to have …
answered Sep 6 '15 by CuriousOne
0
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Can you cite the paper, please? Assuming that it's a modern version of an old experiment, my first guess would be, that the observation uses the fact that the light will induce a constant moment on t …
answered Aug 11 '14 by CuriousOne
14
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Well, the "new" baryons are really just expected short lived combinations of quarks. The only stable free ground state of quarks are protons. The free neutron has already a slightly higher energy than …
answered Jan 6 '15 by CuriousOne
1
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Classical physics describes the movement of the center of gravity of extended bodies, which, when poorly taught, in the mind of the student becomes equivalent with "classical physics being a theory of …
answered Oct 18 '14 by CuriousOne
3
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It means that when the neutrinos hit electrons, the electrons are moving preferentially in the same directions that the neutrinos were moving. So when we are building a water Cherenkov detector for so …
answered Jun 20 '15 by CuriousOne

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