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Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

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If you consider a free particle, the Lagrangian is just $$L=\tfrac{1}{2}m\dot q^2$$ and the equation of motion is $$m\ddot q=0$$ If you shift your coordinate system as $$q\rightarrow q+a$$ your equati …
answered Dec 31 '16 by Photon
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The kick itself just gives the ball some initial velocity and then the movement is considered after the ball already reached this velocity. To put it a bit more formally, we are not interested in the …
answered Feb 13 '16 by Photon
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The idea is to use energy conservation. Since we are dealing with an icy slope, the energy losses due to friction will be minimal but maybe not exactly zero. If we assume that they are exactly zero, w …
answered May 27 '18 by Photon
14
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If you and your friend are interacting, when he pulls you, he will feel that you apply to him the same force as he applies to you. If both of you are in vacuum and no further forces are present, the c …
answered Jan 21 '18 by Photon
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As far as I know, each vector field can be unambiguously split into a gradient and a rotational part: $$\mathbf{F} = \nabla \phi + \nabla \times \mathbf A$$ This is called the Helmholtz decompositio …
answered Apr 13 '18 by Photon
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Unfortunately I cannot comment due to insufficient reputation, so here a comment on the question. There are three cases: $\frac{1}{2}mv_A^2>2mgR$ In this case the pearl has a velocity $v>0$ in the t …
answered Apr 12 '14 by Photon
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The second answer is wrong because it is missing the angles from the vector products: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angular_momentum#Vector_.E2.80.94_angular_momentum_in_three_dimensions
answered Apr 8 '17 by Photon
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Very nice question! You can see this from the second Newton's law: $$m\ddot{\mathbf{x}} = \mathbf{F}(\mathbf{x})$$ Now I would like to integrate this equation of motion with respect to time, to arri …
answered Jan 28 '18 by Photon