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A theory that describes how matter interacts dynamically with the geometry of space and time. It was first published by Einstein in 1915 and is currently used to study the structure and evolution of the universe, as well as having practical applications like GPS.

6
votes
2answers
I'm reading (I'm trying to read) Schutz's "A first course in general relativity" (1985). On page 126 he mentions that a small change in angle theta in polar coordinates is given by: I can't see why …
asked Jun 20 '11 by Peter4075
4
votes
1answer
I'm trying to understand the difference between proper distance $d\sigma$ and coordinate distance $dr$ in Schwarzschild geometry. The bottom bit of the diagram represents flat space, the upper bit cur …
asked Dec 19 '11 by Peter4075
1
vote
1answer
I'm trying to understand proper distance equation in Schwarzschild spacetime. $d\sigma=\frac{dr}{\left(1-\frac{R_{S}}{r}\right)^{1/2}}$. I'm sure I'm missing something really obvious here, but how d …
asked Dec 20 '11 by Peter4075
1
vote
0answers
I've worked through Carroll's explanation of the Newtonian limit as far as $h_{00}=-2\phi$ (page 106 - Lecture Notes on General Relativity). As he's previously stated that $\left|h_{\mu\upsilon}\righ …
asked Sep 15 '11 by Peter4075
5
votes
2answers
Why, if the Schwarzschild metric is a vacuum solution ($T_{\mu\nu}=0$) , do textbooks state that $T=\rho c^{2}$ when approximating Poisson's Equation from the Einstein Field Equations? Thank you.
asked Sep 28 '11 by Peter4075
2
votes
1answer
I'm still struggling with Carroll's discussion of the Newtonian Limit. I'm hoping no one will mind if I ask several questions here as they all relate to the same section (pages 105-106) of his “Lectur …
asked Sep 12 '11 by Peter4075
3
votes
1answer
I'm reading that general relativity let's us describe physics from the point of view of both inertial and accelerated observers. What does that actually mean in terms of doing actual physics? For exam …
asked Nov 13 '11 by Peter4075
5
votes
4answers
Einstein described his discovery of the equivalence principle as the "happiest thought of my life". Why? What, in broad conceptual terms, is the logical chain of reasoning that leads from the equiva …
asked Aug 10 '11 by Peter4075
2
votes
0answers
Einstein predicted gravitational waves in 1916 as a solution to his field equations. Apart from doing experiments, is it possible to tell which solutions exist in the real world and which don't? Are t …
asked Feb 19 '16 by Peter4075
15
votes
I've been trying to teach myself GTR for about the last twelve months. I stopped my formal maths/physics education when I was 18, many years ago. IMveryveryHO you could do worse than starting with th …
answered Jan 31 '12 by Peter4075
1
vote
2answers
In Schutz's A First Course in General Relativity (p122) he derives the polar coordinate basis vector$$\vec{e_{r}}=\frac{\partial x}{\partial r}\vec{e_{x}}+\frac{\partial y}{\partial r}\vec{e_{y}.}$$ …
asked Jan 15 '16 by Peter4075
7
votes
1answer
In Carroll's online Lecture Notes on General Relativity (p112) he says, "the weakness of the gravitational field allows us to decompose the metric into the Minkowski form plus a small perturbation" …
asked Sep 10 '11 by Peter4075
2
votes
2answers
Thinking about the equivalence principle, is there a nice, simple way to show that a local, freely falling frame in Schwarzschild spacetime is described by the Minkowski metric $$ds{}^{2}=c^{2}dt^{2} …
asked Jul 12 '13 by Peter4075
4
votes
2answers
Trying to teach myself general relativity and have just hit yet another confusion. I'm reading that in curved spacetime the energy-momentum tensor has zero divergence, ie $$\nabla_{\mu}T^{\mu\nu}=0.$ …
asked May 5 '12 by Peter4075
2
votes
4answers
I'm struggling with the notion of an inertial frame of reference. I suspect my difficulty lies with the difference between Newtonian and relativistic inertial frames, but I can't see it. I've read t …
asked Nov 12 '11 by Peter4075

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