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Classical mechanics discusses the behaviour of macroscopic bodies under the influence of forces (without necessarily specifying the origin of these forces). If it's possible, USE MORE SPECIFIC TAGS like [newtonian-mechanics], [lagrangian-formalism], and [hamiltonian-formalism].

2
votes
I think the question can be simplified by asking considering the difference between the upwards and downwards part when doing squats. Let's first consider a very simple model: A vertical spring hangi …
answered Sep 19 '17 by JiK
4
votes
Long story short, to get to the core of your question, I hope First, some functions don't correspond to their Taylor series at $0$. But let's ignore that for this answer. But, more importantly: The …
answered Jun 26 '18 by JiK
4
votes
Peter Green's answer already showed you the error ($x=\sqrt{l^2-y^2}$ isn't generally true), but you can also directly see that $y$ isn't a sufficient coordinate: No matter how fast the pendulum move …
answered Oct 1 '17 by JiK