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Quantum entanglement is the mechanism by which quantum correlations between two sub-systems survive even after being physically separated from an interaction region. The correlations could in principle survive without neither time nor space constraint.

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"What I know about quantum entanglement is almost nothing" Start by taking a look here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_entanglement or, if you don't have some exposure to (formal) quantum …
answered Oct 25 '13 by Siva
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No, it's not a Boolean property. Entanglement between two quantum systems (could be particles, or anything else) could be partial, and can be quantified using different measures. In the specific examp …
answered May 23 '13 by Siva
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But is the state of the particle A a real mixed state? That is not the right question to ask. The question should be: how does any particular observer describe system A. An observer who doesn't k …
answered Mar 20 '13 by Siva
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I'm posting a modified version of my comment as an answer, as more people will see it this way. I think the confusion hinges crucially on what kind of partitioning you're doing. The $\nu=1$ QH state …
answered Sep 20 '13 by Siva
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Even though you think of it as a single particle -- each of it's different properties like momentum, spin, etc (corresponding to each valid quantum number) sits in a Hilbert space of their own and the …
answered Apr 14 '14 by Siva
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What you've described seems to be one example. In general, interactions between two quantum systems will put the system into some joint state which will generically be entangled. For example, if you h …
answered May 18 '13 by Siva