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Classical mechanics discusses the behaviour of macroscopic bodies under the influence of forces (without necessarily specifying the origin of these forces). If it's possible, USE MORE SPECIFIC TAGS like [newtonian-mechanics], [lagrangian-formalism], and [hamiltonian-formalism].

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A really simple way of thinking about the shell theorem is that it applies to an infinitesimally thin spherical shell of constant surface density. Then, any spherically symmetric ball of stuff (even i …
answered Jul 8 '11 by Dan
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The general solution to the classical wave equation is $$y(x,t)=f(\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{x}-wt)$$ where $f$ is an arbitrary function. In this case, $f(x)=(0.35m)\sin(-x+\frac{pi}{4})$. Basically, w …
answered May 22 '13 by Dan
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The Hamiltonian is in general not equal to the energy when the coordinates explicitly depend on time. For example, we can take the system of a bead of mass $m$ confined to a circular ring of radius $ …
answered Jul 5 '11 by Dan
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It looks like you've already found the final distace through the use of the kinetic energy forumla and the gravitational potential energy formula. To find the acceleration, you need to use newton's s …
answered Jul 25 '11 by Dan
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You can think of it in terms of kinetic energy: For a particle to gain kinetic energy, work must be done on the body. Work is defined as $$W=\int \mathbf{F} \cdot d\mathbf{x} $$ Because this is a do …
answered Jun 14 '13 by Dan
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6answers
Noether's theorem relates symmetries to conserved quantities. For a central potential $V \propto \frac{1}{r}$, the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector is conserved. What is the symmetry associated with the co …
asked Dec 10 '11 by Dan
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They are: The definition of the scattering cross-section in terms of the scattering amplitude. HO/photon creation operator. Angular momentum raising and lowering operator. Heisenberg equations of mo …
answered Jul 20 '11 by Dan