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Classical mechanics discusses the behaviour of macroscopic bodies under the influence of forces (without necessarily specifying the origin of these forces). If it's possible, USE MORE SPECIFIC TAGS like [newtonian-mechanics], [lagrangian-formalism], and [hamiltonian-formalism].

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You would have to include the tension as a generalized force if you did away with the constraint that $r$ is constant when writing your Lagrangian (since it acts inward towards the support, that is, a …
answered Dec 18 '17 by Samarth
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I'm only beginning to learn the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations (currently in chapter 9 of Goldstein), so please bear with me if my problem is too elementary. I can see the point of going fro …
asked Nov 4 '17 by Samarth
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They're (in principle) different quantities, that coincide for velocity-independent potentials in a Cartesian coordinate system. The Lagrangian and the generalized momenta in such a system are $$ \be …
answered Dec 24 '17 by Samarth