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Quantum mechanics describes the microscopic properties of nature in a regime where classical mechanics no longer applies. It explains phenomena such as the wave-particle duality, quantization of energy and the uncertainty principle and is generally used in single body systems. Use the quantum-field-theory tag for the theory of many-body quantum-mechanical systems.

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I watched a TED talk by the scientist Aaron D. O'Connell about actually seeing quantum superposition. The link to the talk is :- http://www.ted.com/talks/aaron_o_connell_making_sense_of_a_visible_qua …
asked Mar 22 '14 by rahulgarg12342
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Although I know that interaction free experiments come under Quantum Physics, Don't the kind of violate the Heisenberg uncertainty principle? Because you get a value without interacting with the parti …
asked Apr 2 '15 by rahulgarg12342
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Well, such things are impossible to prove theoretically as these are things which we have no idea about. Its more of a philosophical topic than a theory and requires exploration or a visual proof. If …
answered Jan 19 '14 by rahulgarg12342
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Almost all uncertainties (for example the position-momentum uncertainty or time-energy uncertainty) are greater than ${\hbar}/{2} $. But what is the derivation of this uncertainty by Heisenberg? Is th …
asked Sep 6 '14 by rahulgarg12342
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I know that an electron or any other particle for that matter, has a measured spin which is either up or down. This spin is along the z-axis. But what if we do not measure it along the z-axis and do i …
asked Sep 2 '14 by rahulgarg12342
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Consider the following image from Wikipedia and based on it I have a doubt. I do not understand why are the light waves represented like the waves in water. Shouldn't the waves be like sine waves. …
asked Feb 13 '14 by rahulgarg12342
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I was reading a sciencenews.org post about three photons being entangled. My question here is, why is the chance of producing an entangled pair once in a billion times? Isn't every particle produced i …
asked Sep 18 '14 by rahulgarg12342
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I have always found the concept of spin a little weird. I had read somewhere that for the charge or size of electrons, their magnetic field is very high. In order to produce such fields, they must be …
asked Jul 17 '14 by rahulgarg12342