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The special theory of relativity describes the motion and dynamics of objects moving at significant fractions of the speed of light.

4
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Just to expand on my comment more, essentially what we are looking at is the special orthogonal group of order 4, often abbreviated SO(4). "Special" (also sometimes called normal) as it's determinate …
answered Jul 16 '11 by Benjamin Horowitz
3
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As others mentioned, special relativity (by definition really) doesn't have anything to do with curved surfaces! Special relativity has a particular metric (minkowski metric) which has no curvature. I …
answered Aug 5 '11 by Benjamin Horowitz
16
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Here is an interesting site about this idea and similar ideas: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SpeedOfLight/FTL.html#3 Essentially the problem with this idea is there are no such thi …
answered May 29 '11 by Benjamin Horowitz
0
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Another way of looking at this is looking at symmetries and invariances of nature. Lorentz invariance (the main result of special relativity) is a key property in all of modern physics. Quantum field …
answered Sep 28 '11 by Benjamin Horowitz
1
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Remember that indices are just a bookkeeping technique for summation, with the added benefit that upper and lower indices indicate how the object transforms under coordinate transformations (i.e. cov …
answered Jan 12 '17 by Benjamin Horowitz
10
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I would generally say that most physicists mean "speed of light in a vacuum" when they say "speed of light," and therefore would say that the "speed of light is constant." If it is in a field that oft …
answered Sep 19 '11 by Benjamin Horowitz