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A black hole is a volume from which matter cannot escape. More formally, the coordinate speed of light at the event horizon - the boundary of a black hole - is zero, as measured by a sufficiently separated observer.

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I think you are looking at an imaginative artist's impression rather than a photograph. In the only photograph I know of, there is a broad, bright ring around the SMBH which is actually the accretion …
answered Jun 16 by Michael Walsby
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I think brightness is more likely related to the amount of infalling matter available from the accretion disc. All quasars are powered by very large, supermassive black holes, but the biggest variable …
answered Jun 21 by Michael Walsby
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I see no reason why both effects could not contribute to the heating,one does not exclude the other. Collisions between particles in the accretion disc must make some contributon,but that probably com …
answered May 15 by Michael Walsby
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No black hole has ever yet evaporated;the energy they absorb from their surroundings far exceeds what they lose by Hawking radiation. It may well be the case that the universe will collapse & be recyc …
answered May 24 by Michael Walsby
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The blue light would be yellow, orange or red, depending on how close to the event horizon the spaceship was. The longer interval between signals is mainly because of gravitational time dilation, not …
answered May 23 by Michael Walsby
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There doesn't seem to be any limit to the amount of mass which can disappear into a singularity. According to the Big Crunch-Big Bounce theory of the end of the universe(now fallen from favour but not …
answered Jun 17 by Michael Walsby