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In introductory mechanics, the momentum of a particle is its mass times its velocity. In electrodynamics, the momentum of a field is proportional to the cross-product of the electric field with the magnetic field. In special relativity, momentum is generalized to four-momentum.

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I came across this question in text book and was not sure how to solve it. When momentum is conserved then $$ m_{H_2} \Delta v_{H_2} = -m_{Photon} \Delta v_{Photon} $$ But then photon has a zero … rest mass which eventually leads to $\Delta v_{H_2}=0$, doesn't it. And when momentum is conserved does it not mean that the energy of the molecule stays the same? But then that is the basis for vibration and rotation spectroscopy. …
asked Dec 21 '18 by Jung