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Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

5
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Rolling wheels do not pivot about their centers. They pivot about the contact point with the floor, or in the case of deformation the centerline of the contact. Move the center of rotation down by $ …
answered Feb 24 by cms
0
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It depends on how much friction is in the pulley If you wish the person to descend at constant speed, then they need exactly 150lb of tension in the rope to balance their weight. How you get that 150 …
answered Dec 6 '18 by cms
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You are correct that the bird is a carefully disguised pendulum. Notice the tips of the wings are slightly forward of the beak and slightly lower. The wing tips have heavy weights in them. This allo …
answered Feb 17 '18 by cms
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Let's estimate error margins for your numbers, apply error propagation and see what happens. Let the error estimate for the terminal velocity equation be: $$\delta v_t = \sqrt{({\partial v_t \over \pa …
answered May 14 '18 by cms
23
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The answer is a little more nuanced than a simple yes or no, but for most cyclists stopping distance will increase with mass. Allow me to explain how: We can use the work-energy theorem to write down …
answered Mar 22 '18 by cms
5
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The depth of the crater will depend primarily on three things: The height the marble is dropped from. The diameter of the marble. The mass of the marble. To investigate Newton's 2nd law, you are g …
answered Jan 18 '18 by cms
2
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A good trick to remember when analyzing continuous masses is to think about what happens in the much simpler case of finite masses. For instance, replace the rod of length $L$ with three sections of e …
answered Jan 16 '18 by cms
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Put a pendulum in your box attached to the lid and set it swinging before you drop the box on the conveyor belt: The dynamic (kinetic) friction will then implicitly depend on time: $$ f_k(t) = \mu_k …
answered Feb 17 '18 by cms
0
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Electric and Magnetic fields transform for moving frames of reference: $$\begin{align} \vec E' &= \gamma( \vec E + \vec v \times \vec B ) - (\gamma - 1)(\vec E \cdot \hat v) \hat v \\ \vec B' &= \gam …
answered Mar 23 '18 by cms
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As @SprocketsAreNotGears mentioned, your assumption of forces constrained to the lines OM2 and M1M2 is wrong: rods are not ropes A rod can exert a force perpendicular to its length. An idealized ro …
answered Apr 24 '18 by cms
195
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Since this is PhysicsSE, I am happy with an answer based purely on theoretical analysis of the forces involved. Oh boy, time to spend way too much time on a response. Lets assume the simple mod …
answered Jan 24 '18 by cms
1
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Short Answer: For the ideal scenario, the path the cuboid takes is independent of friction. The primary way your desk experiments differ from the ideal scenario is your assumption that the applied fo …
answered Nov 21 '18 by cms
0
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The choice of z-axis seems fairly obvious: it should be perpendicular to the plane of Earth's orbit (a.k.a the ecliptic plane). You may then think picking an x-axis is arbitrary, but it's not. Because …
answered Jan 25 '18 by cms
0
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I believe you are confusing the relationship $\vec F$ has to $\vec x$ with $dx$. The spring force is given by Hooke's Law: $\vec F = -k \vec x$. It has no relationship to $dx$.For example: A 1-dimen …
answered Feb 8 '18 by cms
0
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The issue is nomenclature The nomenclature around forces in physics textbooks (and physicist) isn't standardized enough to give a definite answer to your question. Instead, you will just have to pick …
answered Jun 6 '18 by cms