Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 148184

The special theory of relativity describes the motion and dynamics of objects moving at significant fractions of the speed of light.

1
vote
The text says "By symmetry RU = SV and so these events are equidistant according to B. However, the signal RQ was sent before the signal SP and so B concludes that the event Q took place well befor …
answered Mar 24 '17 by robphy
2
votes
From your setup, there is symmetry to exploit. If you break up the T-to-3T trip in half, you can see [by drawing a spacetime diagram] that you have four congruent legs to your trip. You just calculate …
answered Feb 1 by robphy
1
vote
I assume that these questions deal specifically with the [simple] twin paradox, where the twins reunite after separation with one twin inertial and the other non-inertial [but piecewise-inertial]. B …
answered Apr 14 '17 by robphy
1
vote
Radar methods are not the only way to establish position and time coordinates. One can use Einstein's rods and clocks. For inertial motion in Special Relativity, they lead to identical coordinate assi …
answered Mar 24 '17 by robphy
0
votes
The short answer: Length Contraction involves the apparent spatial separation of two parallel [timelike] worldlines, marking the ends of a stick. The contraction depends only on the relative-speed …
answered Mar 20 by robphy
1
vote
Here's a spacetime diagram drawn on rotated graph paper (so that one can more easily measure displacements in time and space along segments and so that one can visualize the orthogonality between an o …
answered Apr 24 by robphy
1
vote
The complete diagram from d'Inverno (p. 23) is shown below. It appears that observer-A has performed radar experiments on events P and Q. Observer-A assigns time-coordinates to events as the halfway t …
answered Mar 23 '17 by robphy
2
votes
As @Luke says, they will always be at relative rest.... but only in the LAB frame. The distinction is necessary because the two simultaneous events that are used for comparison are spatially separated …
answered Nov 8 '18 by robphy
1
vote
Formulas alone might be hard to implement. A spacetime diagram on rotated graph paper might be useful here, together with some geometrical intuition. Bob travels at (4/5)c (given by the Minkowski …
answered Mar 16 '17 by robphy
1
vote
While $\lambda= \frac{ c-v}{c}\gamma\lambda_o$ is correct [where $\gamma=\frac{1}{\sqrt{1-(v/c)^2}}$], $\lambda(laser)= \frac{ c-v}{c}\gamma^2\lambda_o$ is incorrect since $\lambda(laser)\neq \gamma …
answered Apr 17 '17 by robphy
2
votes
Here's a spacetime diagram on rotated graph paper which may help visualize the result you obtained and help develop a strategy for getting the result from time-dilation and length contraction. The tr …
answered Mar 13 '18 by robphy
3
votes
Here is a spacetime diagram [drawn on rotated graph paper] of the back of the stick showing two reference frames, one for the back of the stick (through the origin event), and the other for the fro …
answered Feb 21 by robphy
0
votes
Here are two geometrical ways to calculate the invariant mass in this totally-inelastic collision. I will use the example cited by Rumplestillskin: A ball of mass 16kg with velocity 3/5c inelasti …
answered Mar 15 '17 by robphy
1
vote
Consider the worldlines of the electrons (in motion, say with $v=0.25c$ for convenience) and the protons (at rest) in Alice's frame where the wire is neutral. Let's draw this on a spacetime diagram on …
answered Apr 13 '17 by robphy
1
vote
For simplicity, suppose your observers meet at an event M. Construct the unit hyperbola in the future light cone of M. Given an inertial worldline through M, locate the intersection event (call it Q) …
answered Nov 26 '17 by robphy

15 30 50 per page