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Newtonian mechanics covers the discussion of the movement of classical bodies under the influence of forces by making use of Newton’s three laws. For more general discussion of energy, momentum conservation etc., use classical-mechanics, for Newton’s description of gravity, use newtonian-gravity.

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I think it is obvious in the diagram that you can move the box along the plane without "disturbing" it (lift it a fraction of a mm so that they are not in contact anymore and move your box freely alon …
answered May 14 by S V
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This is because force can be defined in terms of potential energy, which is generally taken to be only a function of position. $$\mathbf{F}:=-\boldsymbol{\nabla}V(\mathbf{r})$$ Here we can use the ide …
answered Feb 12 by S V
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The simplest way is to see it as a change of variable (you may know it as "u-substitution"): If $v^2=v^2(t)$ we have: $$\text{d}(v^2)=\frac{\text{d}(v^2)}{\text{d}t}\text{d}t$$ Which is exactly wha …
answered Feb 28 by S V
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For the first part of your question I believe that global conservation of angular momentum can mostly explain it: We are assuming that we have a very large number of particles, already the three body …
answered Jun 6 by S V