Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options questions only user 132371
0
votes
3answers
How can the speed of light, c be the same to an observer who is moving in the same direction with 0.9c and to another observer who isn't moving? If there is an observer who is following (moving in th …
asked Oct 7 '16 by Árpád Szendrei
1
vote
2answers
$$ And this should be 0 in any inertial reference frame for the graviton too. Now as per SR (second postulate): the speed of light in vacuum is the same for all observers, regardless of the light … source Now for GWs (like EM waves), it should be true that: the speed of GWs in vacuum is the same for all observers regardless of the motion of the GW's source In this case, gravity could be …
asked Jul 25 '18 by Árpád Szendrei
1
vote
2answers
I have read these questions: If you fall in a black hole, when do you go past the event horizon? Can matter really fall through an event horizon? How can anything ever fall into a black hole as s …
asked Oct 23 '18 by Árpád Szendrei
0
votes
4answers
Is there an experiment where they tested if c is constant to any observer moving at any speed in any direction? Am I correct that to check the speed of light for two observers (and letting both … observers know each other's results) we would need to exchange information in between the two observers, and that the exchange of information can only be done also with max c speed? So how would we let the other observer know of our results if we can send information only with max c speed? …
asked Oct 10 '16 by Árpád Szendrei
1
vote
1answer
As I understood we were not able but then i read John Rennie's question and answer here: Does light really travel more slowly near a massive body? And got me a little bit curious. He says: We c …
asked Apr 14 '18 by Árpád Szendrei
3
votes
2answers
This is not a duplicate, my question is not about whether BHs have or don't have a singularity, but my question is whether, because of time dilation, no matter has reached the center and formed a sing …
asked May 19 by Árpád Szendrei