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19
votes
The neutron is in no way "composed" of a proton and an electron. It can decay to a proton, electron, and an antineutrino. But that doesn't mean that these three particles literally co-exist inside the …
answered Apr 28 '15 by Luboš Motl
2
votes
You should definitely pre-order Lisa Randall's Knocking on Heaven's door, to be released in September, http://www.amazon.com/Knocking-Heavens-Door-Scientific-Illuminate/dp/006172372X which is de …
answered May 3 '11 by Luboš Motl
1
vote
I guess that the peak comes from events in which the muons have the same origin (a decay of a highly boosted Z-boson, for example) so they have almost the same energies; in other events, the two muons …
answered Aug 17 '13 by Luboš Motl
6
votes
The first quote that Feynman wrote in the 1960s remained as accurate and crisp as it was 50 years ago. The quantum randomness can't ever be predicted, even in principle, so there are no hidden wheels …
answered Jul 5 '13 by Luboš Motl
3
votes
The particles such as electrons and protons (or electrons and quarks, depending on how deeply one gets; when you look carefully, even protons may be decomposed to smaller pieces) are called "elementar …
answered Aug 5 '12 by Luboš Motl