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The special theory of relativity describes the motion and dynamics of objects moving at significant fractions of the speed of light.

0
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Because I like setting the $x$ axis point towards the right, reverse the speed on your figure. In the lab frame, the light moving towards the mirror A reaches the mirror in a time $\Delta t_1$ determi …
answered Jun 1 '16 by jim
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One important proviso: According to A. P. French, Special Relativity, MIT Introductory Physics Series (1968) pp 149-152 (still a gem as far as I'm concerned) who noted that there is an important diffe …
answered Aug 23 '16 by jim
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Yes, you have to assume that $v/c << 1$ and expand the denominator by it's small value approximation, $\frac{1}{(1+\ v /\mu c)} ≈1 − v/\mu c$, ignoring terms $(v/c)^2$ (refractive indices are usually …
answered May 12 '16 by jim
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The definition ${\bf F} = \frac{d{\bf p}}{dt}$ is valid in all inertial frames (assuming not considering relativity). If you have another inertial frame you can replace ${\bf v}\to {\bf v' = {\bf v} + …
answered Apr 23 '16 by jim
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What is meant is that physical laws are the same between (inertial) reference frames so that if you observe two bodies undergoing an elastic collision then you will experimentally determine that the m …
answered May 28 '16 by jim
1
vote
0answers
Richard Muller has, in a recent Physics Today interview, argued that time is incorrectly incorporated into special and general relativity, suggesting that while you can choose any coordinate system an …
asked Jul 17 '17 by jim
7
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According to: G Ares de Parga, B López-Carrera and F Angulo-Brown Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and General, Volume 38, Number 13 2005 "A proposal for relativistic transformations in thermodynam …
answered Aug 19 '16 by jim
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The four vector $p$ is given as $(E,{\bf p})$ so that $$(p' -p)^2 = (E' - E)^2 - ({\bf p'} - {\bf p})^2 = (E'^2 - {\bf p'}^2) + (E^2 - {\bf p}^2)- 2E'E + 2 {\bf p'} \cdot {\bf p}$$ Then put $E'E \ap …
answered May 21 '16 by jim
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Too long for a comment (given some of the assumptions I make, I'm not sure how accurate the final result for the speed $v$ is): The density of rock may be taken as approximately $\rho \approx 3 g/cm^ …
answered Jan 9 '18 by jim
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James and Griffiths, Am J Phys 60, 309-313 1992, treat the transmission and reflection of a plane em wave normally incident on a transparent medium. Using a perturbative approach they argue that the i …
answered Aug 17 '16 by jim
1
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The observer moving with the CM will measure that the force of repulsion the electrons is given by $F=\frac{e^2}{4 \pi \epsilon_0 d^2}$ ($d$ is their separation), he can only make measurements in his …
answered May 1 '16 by jim
3
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In the kinetic theory of gases, you only really define the temperature for molecules that are in constant, random, and rapid motion. So if you have a container with a gas at temperature $T$ you don't …
answered Jun 18 '16 by jim
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I think it was partially motivated by the following: With Maxwell's equations, a plane wave is a sinusoidal wave that varies in space in time and moving with speed $c$. These variations are linked by …
answered Apr 9 '16 by jim
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The question may be about the covariance or otherwise of temperature, in which case have a look here. As well, have a look at the paper "Temperature in special relativity" by J. Lindhard, Physica Volu …
answered Jun 19 '16 by jim
8
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2answers
Einstein was partially motivated by the following: With Maxwell's equations, a plane wave is a sinusoidal wave that varies in space in time and moving with speed $c$. These variations are linked by Ma …
asked May 15 '16 by jim