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Electrostatics is concerned with the electrical fields and scalar potentials of stationary electrical charges and charge distributions. Use this for questions about electromagnetic situations in which currents and magnetic fields are absent, otherwise use [tag:electromagnetism] and/or [tag:magnetic-fields]

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field. But I also remember from college that to good approximation you can use electrostatics to compute the electric field due to the charge if the current is steady, in spite of the fact that charges are moving. I never understood how this works. Can someone offer insight? …
asked Sep 5 '12 by David H
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In an attempt to be brief: The big thing to remember is that the flux is also proportional to the area (technically, the surface integral of the field over the area). Crudely speaking, the side of the …
answered May 7 '13 by David H
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complicated surfaces pretty effortlessly. This question is putting the buggy before the horse. A "capacitor" in the context of electrostatics defined simply as a pair of conductors with non-overlapping …
answered Jul 24 '12 by David H
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Well, suppose the charges equalize so half the charge of the cathode goes to the plate connected to it. What happens next? The redox reaction inside the battery charges the cathode back up to full val …
answered Apr 9 '13 by David H
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As one commenter has already noted, you could proceed by showing that the curl of the electric field in question is not identically zero. You can also show this by way of contradiction. If you assume …
answered Jan 11 '14 by David H
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The short answer is the Heisenberg uncertainty principle allows for the attraction. Suppose you have two opposite charges, and the one on the left emits a virtual photon with momentum directed leftwar …
answered Oct 7 '13 by David H
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When a charge is moved from one point to another along some equipotential surface, it is true that the work done on the charge by the electric field is zero. Additional work done on the particle over …
answered Apr 15 '13 by David H