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This tag is for the classical concept of forces, i.e. the quantities causing an acceleration of a body. It expands to the strong/electroweak force only insofar as they act comparable to ‘classical’ forces. Use [tag:particle-physics] for decay channels due to forces and [tag:newtonian-mechanics] or one of the other subtopics of [tag:classical-mechanics] for the dynamics of classical systems.

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\rightarrow Alice}$ in both cases. Also the work done by the active person seems to be equal to the work done by the passive person because both the forces and the displacements are equal in magnitude. Is this correct? Does it take exactly the same amount of energy to pull as it takes to being pulled? …
asked Apr 25 '18 by Marc
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I'm interested in the maximum force which a human can apply to an object by pulling it with a rope (assuming a very good standing on the ground). A natural limit seems to be his weight but in the diff …
asked Nov 26 '17 by Marc
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The situation sketched above is often used for problems involving tension. Let's say we know the masses $m$ and want to determine the tension $T$ in the rope (no friction, massless rope). Since t …
asked Aug 23 '17 by Marc
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I'm not very familiar with continuum mechanics and have a hard time combining my knowledge of forces from simple mechanics with what I read about continuum mechanics. Let's suppose we have a metal … of forces is that they need a point of application - where would this point be? Is it a single point? All points of the cross-sectional area at once? The latter seems to conflict with the notion that …
asked May 29 '18 by Marc