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How does “warp drive” not violate Special Relativity causality constraints?

I'm talking about this nonsense: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2014/06/11/this-is-the-amazing-design-for-nasas-star-trek-style-space-ship-the-ixs-enterprise/

Now, I'm aware that there are problems with the practicalities (or possibilities) of methods involving exotic matter with negative mass, and that kind of thing has been addressed here: http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/95200/doesnt-warp-theory-violate-causality

But in this case my question is different and more specific. Sweeping all the other problems of constructing such a beast under the rug, wouldn't this violate causality?

SR says that the simultaneity and relative ordering of events is dependent on the relative motion of the observer, but that no matter how it works out, if event A causes event B, no observer will see B first. One of the many problems with FTL travel (or signals) is that if any information is sent faster than light, there will exist an inertial frame in which the signal arrives before it is sent, a blatant violation of causality. (I think we can all agree, can we not, that the threshold should be extremely high before breaking assumptions that we're in a causal universe?)

So how is any scheme to travel faster than light, even if it may locally satisfy the equations of GR, not a blatant violation causality according to SR?

Is my understanding of GR incomplete and there's something in it that obviates the causality implications of SR? Or am I correct that FTL claims should be dismissed with extreme prejudice on this basis alone? (Pending a serious replicable experiment showing causality to be breakable.)