Questions tagged [wavelength]

The wavelength of a sinusoidal wave is the spatial period of the wave—the distance over which the wave's shape repeats, and the inverse of the spatial frequency or wavenumber. Determined by considering the distance between consecutive corresponding points of the same phase, such as crests. Use for wavenumber, wavelength, frequency.

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Why are there no even harmonics in a closed pipe?

I have seen a diagram on sites such as hyperphysics.com that show that there is a missing bit every time so that it makes every harmonic odd. I was hoping I could get a more intuitive explanation. We ...
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Which formulae should I use when calculating the frequency of an electron given its speed? [duplicate]

If I know the speed of an electron, how should I go about calculating its frequency? For example, if the electron was travelling at $v$ $ms^{-1}$ there are two options I could take. Calculate the ...
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Has anyone tried to find the wavelength to the Corona virus cell? [closed]

I have seen websites and videos that show how cancer cells can be destroyed using sound resonance oscillation. So has anyone heard of anyone who is in the field of sound resonance trying to capture ...
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Why are diffraction rings closer together when electrons travel at a greater speed in electron diffraction?

I know that at higher speeds the de Broglie wavelength decreases so the electrons diffract less, but does the fact electrons repel affect it in any other way? What I was thinking was that since ...
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Why do we demand that $\lambda \ll \text{size of slit}$

I'd appreciate it if anyone could explain to me why do we demand that the wavelength will be much smaller than the distances between the slits in order to see wave diffraction when performing Young's ...
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Relation between frequencies of different harmonies

I know the relation between frequencies of different harmonies is $$ f_n = n\times f_1 $$ but I'm heving trouble to develope the equation which proves this equality. can anyone please give me a lead ...
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Why are diffraction rings closer together when electrons travel at higher speeds in electron diffraction?

Is it because they reach the screen in less time so they have less time to repel or is it because the higher speed means a shorter de Broglie wavelength so they diffract less? Do these 2 reasons link ...
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Why would the frequency of an EMF wave have any relation to the wavelength?

I take a wireless antenna and I run a current through it 3 times per second. I have now created a 3 Hz ELF frequency. According to Wikipedia this radiation has a wavelength of 100000 km. Needless to ...
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How can a picture of a virus be taken when they are not even 300 nm (wavelength of blue light) long?

We cannot take photos of protons because they are not at least the size of the wavelength that registers into visible light. I see photos of Coronavirus in the news everywhere where there is a clear ...
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Question about net distance types of electromagnetic radiation travels

I was comparing the periods of types of electromagnetic radiation and I noticed that types with longer wavelengths seem to travel a greater net distance for each period. Does this mean that types of ...
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Why is the two-term form for the Cauchy equation sufficient?

The general Cauchy equation for the relationship between refractive index and wavelength is given by, $$n = A + \frac{B}{\lambda^{2}}+\frac{C}{\lambda^{4}}+...,$$ but this is often approximated to $$...
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Do all bodies emit all type of radiation?

Does only ideal black body radiate all type of wavelength at any temperature above 0K? Edit: My teacher told us that according to prevost theory all body radiates all type of wavelength? But I ...
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If we had a good enough eyesight would we be able to see atoms and the fuzziness of the quantum world?

If our eyes had enough precision and calibration to see hundreds of thousands smaller scales than we do, surely our brains would also need a major tuneup to process it. But could our classical body ...
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Factors affecting Diffraction

I know that the larger the wavelength, the more the diffraction. However, I have a few questions. Is the diffraction more when the wavelength is equal to the gap size, or when the wavelength is ...
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Wavelength and Wavenumber not matching from Spectracalc [duplicate]

When I use Spectracalc.com to calculate the peak wavelength at 500 Kelvin, I am told the peak is at 5.79551 µm. When I switch the calculation result to wavenumber the peak is said to be at 980.506 cm-...
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How can you draw the wavelength of a wave to show that when a slit is of the order of the wavelength diffraction is at a maximum?

I was looking for a diagram to show how when the wavelength of the wave is of the order of the slit width, then diffraction is maximised. The diagram is supposed to be an intuitive explanation for ...
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How can you show with a diagram that diffraction is at a maximum when the slit width is equal to the wavelength?

Usually a diagram will be given like this But how can you show with a diagram that diffraction can be maximised when the slit width is of the order of the wave's wavelength?
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Black Hole Escape By Quantum Tunneling

The first minute of this explanation: https://youtu.be/ZgOhQhpoczs about Black Hole evaporation (Hawking Radiation) talks about particles with de Broglie wavelengths bigger than the Event Horizon. ...
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To calculate wavelength, is a double-slit experiment or diffraction grating experiment better?

Which one would give the most reliable results and why? Even though in grating experiments you don't have to judge where the centre of a fringe is, wouldn't there be less fringes/principal maxima to ...
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Why is diffraction at a maximum when slit is of order of wavelength? [duplicate]

Diffraction is maximised when the slit is of the order of the wavelength of the wave being diffracted. Why does this happen? Is there a visual way to show this (animation or picture)?
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What has a greater effect on diffraction - increasing wavelength or reducing slit width? [closed]

Diffraction from a slit increases when wavelength increases or slit becomes narrower. Which one would have a greater effect though - changing wavelength or decreasing slit width? Looking for an ...
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Would visible light still be in a separate classification if we saw “colors” in a different wavelength? [duplicate]

Basically im asking if there's anything special about visible light other than the fact that we use it to see colors. If we saw in another wavelength, would it still be possible to see colors like we ...
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1answer
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Why is the constant $c$ replaced by velocity $v$ in this particular derivation?

Is this derivation for de Broglie's wavelength correct? If yes, why is it that we're changing $c$ to $v$? Is that allowed? If we use that logic and reverse engineer the whole derivation, we get $E=...
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If different wavelengths of light have different speeds, how can they move together as a white light in air?

My question is with respect to Newton's experiment of using two identical glass prisms [in which one is inverted with respect to the first one]. When he allowed all the colors of the spectrum to pass ...
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3answers
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Relationship between wavelength and amplitude

So, a wavelength is the distance over which the wave shape repeats. Now that means it is the length of a sine wave from 0 to 2π. Now if we take an example of pendulum (which we can represent In sine ...
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Does wavelength-specific emissivity depend on temperature?

The wavelength-specific emissivity $\epsilon_{\lambda}$ of a body is the ratio of the body's spectral radiance at the specific wavelength compared to that of the ideal blackbody. Does $\epsilon_{\...
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Why and How does different depths of water affect the wavelength of a wave on such medium?

When a water wave passes through from a deep water to shallow water , refraction is said to occur due to it's decrease in wavelength and thus decrease in speed , based on the formula v=fλ. Question is ...
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1answer
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Why amplitude of tsunami increases as it tavels ashore?

I read that there is a displacement between 2 (oceanic) tectonic plate and this drop cause a big potential energy on the wave directly above, I don't buy it because obviously many video footages ...
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What is the Origin of the chromaticity matrix used here?

I found the method to convert RGB values to XY coordinates using chromaticity matrix like this R, B, G -> R', B', G' -> X, Y Image of matrix: https://www.dropbox.com/s/89ys0tizskyv8eu/equations.png?...
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2answers
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Is it possible to converting electromagnetic waves to each other?

For example I have a source that emits X-Rays, is it possible to turning them into visible light or micro waves with the same energy as it was xray (I mean, can I change the frequency or the ...
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Does the Planck length imply that the smallest different between any two wavelengths must also have a limit?

I was looking at a video called How Hot Can It Get, and at 7:08, the host Michael states that if an object were to reach a temperature of $1.41 \times 10^{32}$ K (planck temperature), the ...
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What is responsible for colour of sky seen from ground vs space?

If short wavelength of light such as blue and violet scatters more by air molecules in our atmosphere at noon time along the equator but our eyes can only see the blue sky due to biology, then what ...
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What would happen if 2 different photons overlap each other while travelling in the same direction?

Imagine 2 photons with same wavelength but from different sources overlap each other and since they don't interact with each other I like to know if there is any changes to their wavelength vs solo? ...
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Why is $c$ and $h$ not constant in this equation? [closed]

From the equation: $$(mc^2)^2+(cp)^2 = E^2$$ When rest mass = 0 we get $p = E/c \approx E = p\cdot c$ Looking specifically at photons (zero mass): Granted that c remains constant, any change in E ...
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What determines the frequency of a soundwave?

The frequency of a wave comes from the rate at which the disturbance at the source takes place. My question is, what parameters (on the guitar for example) determine that one string delivers a low ...
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1answer
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Resonant frequencies in organ pipes

I have a series of doubts regarding the principle of organ pipes. For a given length of closed organ pipe there are various modes of vibration for the standing waves.I dont know if this is silly but ...
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1answer
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Does grounded sheet metal reflect or absorb radio waves?

By "radio waves" I mean waves used for radio transmission appliances, e. g. within 1 MHz to 10 GHz. If the size of the metal sheet makes a difference, please answer for a infinite sheet and a fridge. ...
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1answer
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How does the change in speed of sound affect our perception of pitch?

Let’s say the speed of sound is 343m/s and thus the wavelength of the note with frequency 440Hz is about 0.78 meters. If I played the same note through a medium where the speed of sound was doubled to ...
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2answers
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Observable detail and wavelength of light needed to observe - How they are connected?

"If we use light to look at the structure of an object, we need to have its wavelength smaller than the size of the details we wish to look at". I read this statement in an answer at Physics ...
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Why is frequency a fundamental property of waves? [duplicate]

We are taught that although wavelength can change from one medium to other, frequency of a wave doesn't whenever Velocity varies in different media. But why at a deep level, is frequency so ...
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Entanglement thought experiment with redshift

Thought experiment: 2 entangled photons, one escape from galaxy to galaxy without hitting an electron and another one got caught between 2 perfect mirrors. Would the redshift (wavelength becomes ...
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1answer
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$kx$ is the number of wavelengths per $2\pi x$-length segment. But what is $\vec{r}\cdot \vec{k}$?

If $k$ is the wavenumber of a wave and $x$ is a length, then $kx$ is «the number of wavelengths per $2\pi x$-length segment». I have seen that the quantity $\vec{r}\cdot \vec{k}$ appear in many ...
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Reason for such shape of wave [closed]

Why is the shape of wave as such? why are they curves up and down, why not straight lines like up and down squares.
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How is relativistic wavelength shift for a moving detector - stationary source explained?

Relativistic wavelength shift for a stationary source and an receding detector is given by $\frac{\lambda_s}{\lambda_d}=\sqrt\frac{{1-\beta}}{{1+\beta}}=\frac{{1-\beta}}{\sqrt{1-\beta^2}}=\gamma(1-\...
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Are there wavelengths associated with the weak field and strong field bosons?

Are there wavelengths associated with the weak field and strong field bosons? Anyone care to share their take on this?
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Number of Possible Frequencies in Visible Spectum [duplicate]

Quantum physics says that energy is quantised, and since the energy of a photon is only dependent on the wavelength, the wavelength of a photon is quantised. This means that even though an infinite ...
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Wavelength absorbed by cornea but not by air

I'm interested in mounting laser diodes on servos and using them to transmit data. However, I'd rather not accidentally blind someone, even if they (say) stare for five minutes into the beam. My ...
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3answers
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Can physical spaces 'resist' certain sound frequencies?

I whistle a lot, and I'm fairly decent at it. Recently I was walking up the stairs in a house while whistling. As I whistled, I found it difficult to hit a specific note in the song that I would ...
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Spectrum range of black body radiation [duplicate]

Why does a black body emit at all frequencies at thermal equilibrium?
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Units in Representation Of Energy Density Spectrum

In most of the texts, I referred to The Axis being labelled with Units as shown above. But I also found few images with different Notation (1/Units) Being Followed as shown Below. The units of the ...

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