Questions tagged [wavelength]

The wavelength of a sinusoidal wave is the spatial period of the wave—the distance over which the wave's shape repeats, and the inverse of the spatial frequency or wavenumber. Determined by considering the distance between consecutive corresponding points of the same phase, such as crests. Use for wavenumber, wavelength, frequency.

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Why does violet light bend the most? [duplicate]

When white light passes through a prism, refraction occurs and it splits into its seven constituent colours. If the spectrum is obtained on a screen violet light appears much more bent than red light. ...
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What is the derivation of Rayleigh's Equation? How do i get to Rayleigh's equation? [on hold]

im looking for an answer of the derivation of rayleigh's equation, ie; how to get to the equation through derivaiton, thanks
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Why sky is blue? [closed]

The major factor of different scattering is the ratio of wavelength to the size of particles which are working as microscopic scattering mirrors. In a sparse particle medium like air, the longer the ...
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Why does the additive color model use red, green and blue instead of yellow, green and violet?

Long cone cells in the human eye are most sensitive to 570-nm wavelengths which are more like spectral "yellow" than spectral "red" and short cone cells are more to 440-nm wavelengths which are more ...
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Are there accepted spectral lines, or wavelength of light emitted, for the various neural and ionized atoms? If yes, where can I find them? [duplicate]

I am working with the redshift phenomena and analyzing the spectral lines of various emissions by galaxies. However, when I came to analyze the change in wavelength I was confused on what to compare ...
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Why frequency does not change when light passes through the denser medium? [duplicate]

as far as I noticed always people in physics have a predefined assumption that frequency is constant. whereas we know that the c is the outcom of product of wavelength and frequency. we have different ...
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Components of wave vector

Is 3-dimensional wave vector defined as $$ \tag{1} \mathbf{k}=\frac{2\pi}{\lambda_{x}}\mathbf{\hat{x}}+\frac{2\pi}{\lambda_{y}}\mathbf{\hat{y}}+\frac{2\pi}{\lambda_{z}}\mathbf{\hat{z}} ? $$ If it is,...
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Deriving Planck's Constant from Wien's Displacement Law

So I'm reading an introductory book on Quantum Theory (David Park, 3rd ed.) and I am having trouble with the following question: "According to Wien's displacement law, the wavelength $\lambda_m$ at ...
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Why an open tube at both ends suffers resonance? [duplicate]

Why an open tube at both ends suffers resonance when subjected to a sound that propagates through the air with length of where $L / 2$? I already know the methodology to calculate the harmonics in an ...
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Can application of force contract wavelength of particles

When I put the de broglie relation for momentum in Newton's law F=dp/dt I saw that in some way F is inversely proportional to wavelength. So if we apply greater force, the shorter the wavelength ...
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Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle - finding uncertainty in wavelength

I am confused about this problem: I needed to find the uncertainty of a wavelength using Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. In the solution, they differentiated $λ=c/f$ with respect to frequency to ...
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Are kitchen microwaves in the audible range?

The waves of a typical kitchen microwave oven have a wavelength of 12cm while the audible spectrum is between 1.7cm and 17m, so one might think that they overlap and that kitchen microwaves should be ...
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Formation of Red and blue bands in the sky

Today at the time of sunset I saw this The sky is divided into two parts one In red and one in blue which are very distinctive Can anyone tell how? The upper part of the image points towards the ...
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Sizes of Elementary Particles

Present observation shows that elementary particles have no internal structure, and have no real size as they are described by wavefunction. Something that therefore confuses me is that on a lot of ...
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Wavelength of cosine-squared

I am confused. Usually, the wavelength is the x-distance between the tops of two consecutive waves. Here is the graph. There is only 0.1 m between 2 crests. But the answer counts the wavelength as 0....
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Database of Color Emissions

I am reading about the color Green and am wondering if there is a database anywhere listing the atoms/molecules/powders/minerals and their color wavelengths in various forms. Basically I would like a ...
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Wavelength and Lattice constant - need to be the similar magnitudes to have interference?

I was taught that they need to have similar magnitudes but I did an exercise last week and the magnitudes were different by 3 decimal places. Before I also noticed them being either the same or maybe ...
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How can I get the wave number and wave vector? [closed]

$$\overrightarrow{E} = (-10 \hat x + 4 \hat z) e^{-j(2x+5z)}$$ I recently started to study electromagnetics, but I'm having a hard time following up. May I ask how to calculate the wave vector $\...
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Why doesn't the wave's frequency change as it gets refracted? [duplicate]

I know that frequency means a complete wave produced per second. But when the wave gets refracted, it's wavelength decreases. If the wave's wavelength has decreased doesn't it means that the wave has ...
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Why aren't extremely-low-frequency (ELF) radio waves used for underwater radar?

Since extremely-low-frequency radio waves are used by submarines for some simple, low-transmission-rate communications, why can't those same wavelengths be used for submarine radar? It may not be ...
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What is wavelength at classical turning points using WKB Approximation? [closed]

According to what I know is that a classical turning point in Newtonian Mechanics is a point where a particle has a zero kinetic energy (Total energy is equal to potential energy) and must be ...
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What experiment would confirm De Broglie equation on photons?

If we want to check experimentally that, for a photon: λ=h/p (De Broglie equation) Has such experiment been carried out? What is/would be the experimental setup? Wikipedia doesnt show such protocol ...
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Claim that DeBroglie relation doesn't work in crystal

In this Wikipedia article on Position and Momentum Space, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Position_and_momentum_space there is a claim that "the de Broglie relation is not true in a crystal" in the ...
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Focal Length, Wavelength Relationship

I have a cylindrical lens with a design wavelength of 587.6nm. The radius (S2) of the lens is 2mm, and the radius of the opposite face (S1), i assume is 0mm. The focal length is given as 3.91mm and ...
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How are classical and quantum momentum related in an intuitive manner?

I know that quantum momentum is inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probability or matter wave of a given particle, but I don't get how this relation of this abstract mathematical ...
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Can you change the wavelength of light keeping frequency constant and can you do the opposite as well? [duplicate]

Can you change the wavelength of light keeping frequency constant and can you do the opposite as well? I understood the basics but please don't hesitate to go deeper into the concept. Also, If you ...
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Refractive index and optical fibre question

This is an A level AQA question: A signal is to be transmitted along an optical fibre of length 1200m. The signal consists of square pulses of white light and this is to be transmitted along the ...
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1answer
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Logarithms in uncertainties

I'm looking at the following plot: The vertical lines show the upper and lower frequency bounds for each of the bands W4, W3, W2...and I'm trying to convert them to wavelengths using $\lambda=\frac{c}...
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Variation of Refractive index

We know that refractive index, for any medium, $$n=1/\sqrt{\epsilon\mu}.$$ Also, according to Cauchy's relation $$n=A+B/\lambda^2,$$ where $A$ and $B$ are constants related to the medium. ...
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Phase difference in a standing wave?

What would the phase difference between P and Q be? I assumed that because they are 1/4 of a wavelength apart, it would be Pi/2, but supposedly the difference is 0.
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Why use ultrasound for medical imaging? [closed]

What advantage does ultrasound have over sound between 20-20000Hz that it is used in medical imaging over sound in that frequency range?
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How do you combine wavelengths of particles in an atom?

As the problem below results in the wavelength of a single electron, how would this combine/interact with other particles? In an atom, for example.
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When a valence electron is excited, how fast does it move from ground state to excited state?

Imagine an atom with a valence electron becomes excited and the electron moves to a higher orbital, is this transition between ground state and excited state at speed of light? If so, since it is not ...
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Energy levels of electrons in an arbitrary element?

Let's say I want to calculate the wavelength of the photon emitted when an electron of an arbitrary element (let's say Carbon) drops from $n=4$ to $n=3$. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think I would ...
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Why is the extent of scattering of light by particles inversely proportional to the fourth power of the wavelength of the light wave?

When I first came across this, I speculated this law is experimental. However, later I came to know that this is not the case. A concise answer, with some reasoning as to why the negative fourth power ...
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Laser Detection Paint

Does there exist a paint which if a pulsed laser of ~1500-1600nm was fired at it it would emit visible light or IR Radation (3-5 micron)? I have seen up-converting inks and paints but I can't find ...
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Hypothetical maximum energy of a single photon [duplicate]

I'm no physicist so it might be a stupid question but is there a maximum energy a single photon can have? My idea was, that there might be restriction for the minimum wavelength and I thought about ...
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If white light were split through a prism, would it emit more wavelengths than are contained within the visible light spectrum?

If white light was refracted through a prism, creating the colors of the rainbow, would it also create wavelengths of light in the infrared and ultraviolet range, which fall in the non visibility ...
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Dimensions of Faraday shielding mesh

Why should the spacings of the wires that constitute a Faraday cage be smaller than the wavelength of the radiation we wish to prevent from penenetrating inside the cage?
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1answer
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De Broglie explanation of Bohr's second postulate. discrepancy of 2 times?

I am reading how de Broglie justified the 2nd postulate of Niels Bohr (i.e. angular momentum of an electron to be integral multiple of $\frac{h}{2\pi}$). I get his explanation of electron acting like ...
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Is the first harmonic the prevalent frequency? [closed]

Why, when we play a string, almost all of the energy we give them is ''used'' in the first harmonic (the fundamental frequency) rather than be distributed between all of them?
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Is there a resolution limit to electron microscopes?

Is resolution limited only by the wavelength of the electron? Because then I would presume there is no limit to resolution as you could lower the wavelength of an electron by increasing the voltage of ...
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Do photons exist at all possible wavelengths? [duplicate]

My question refers to Photon flux spectrum diagrams. The diagram shows the number of photons at different wavelengths. My question is whether the graph is granular or continuous. Do photons exist at ...
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Energy of light

If a beam of light is travelling in full vacuum in same medium ,then , the energy of the light beam will decrease or not while moving through space ? The wavelength of the beam of light will change ...
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What happens when the wavelength of light becomes as large as the observable universe? [closed]

Say the wavelength of a photon became so large that it approached the size of the observational universe. Does something unexpected happen?
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Why does a stable orbit of $H$ atom contain an integer number of de Broglie wavelengths? [duplicate]

I was trying to understand why a stable orbit of a hydrogen atom has to satisfy that the orbit length must be a multiple of de Broglie wavelength. I have seen some related questions like This. But ...
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Which device to measure UV lamp wavelength with high precision

Which techniques and devices are able to measure the wavelength/frequency of a UV lamp within the wavelength range of 50nm - 300nm? Is a VUV Optical spectrometer the right device for this?
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Wavelength of black color

In absence of visible light when we see any object or space to be dark (black), What is the wavelength we encounter so that the object or space looks dark to us?
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Wavelength to RGB [closed]

I don't know how to convert $xyz$ chromaticity coordinates in sRGB. For example in What {R,G,B} values would represent a 445nm monochrome lightsource color on a computer monitor? the author takes: $$...
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How wide does a door have to be for a cat running through it to interfere with itself? [closed]

A cat runs through a door. Assuming h = 1 J s, mass of the cat is 1 kg, and the velocity of the cat is 1 m/s. Assume the cat is a quantum particle. How wide does this door have to be for the cat to ...