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Questions tagged [wavelength]

The wavelength of a sinusoidal wave is the spatial period of the wave—the distance over which the wave's shape repeats, and the inverse of the spatial frequency or wavenumber. Determined by considering the distance between consecutive corresponding points of the same phase, such as crests. Use for wavenumber, wavelength, frequency.

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Wave-like properties of particles [duplicate]

If we consider a particle such as an electron to have wave-like properties too, what kind of wave it is? What is exactly meant by its wavelength?
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Reference Frames and the De Broglie Wavelength

If the de Broglie wavelength of a massive particle, is h/mv then doesn't that mean interference patterns and everything change their properties depending on the velocity of the observer? How can QM ...
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How can i calculate the frequency of a gluon? [closed]

After conducting research I believe I could use the frequency formula for a photon to calculate the frequency of a gluon, but I have a paradox. My issue is that in order to calculate frequency you ...
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Reflection by a mirror of wavelength type dimensions

Suppose there is a perfectly reflecting mirror, which is somehow made to the size of wavelength is visible light. Will there be any reflection now, or will it act in some other way? I thought there ...
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Pulling a string with both ends fixed [duplicate]

Consider a string with both ends fixed. If somewhere in middle of it be pulled and released, how would it oscillate and what is it's equation? My solution assuming the result is a standing wave: The ...
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Why the cycles completed by standing wave completed by electron in a certain orbit is same as principle quantum number?

According to the bohr model and de-broglie hypothesis why the cycles completed by standing wave completed by electron in a certain orbit is same as principle quantum number? When we derive the ...
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Why must I solve the de Broglie relationship in a single dimension instead of all three?

Context: a particle of mass $m$ can move in 3D and is trapped inside of a sphere of radius $R$ and impenetrable walls (in a more mathematical sense, the potential energy is 0 inside of the sphere and $...
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The length of a string attached to a wall?

I feel really dumb for asking this question. I apologize in advance. When the example of a string attached to a wall is given to explain waves and the ressonance frequencies, the length of the string ...
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Calculate the length of the string if it is vibrating at the 4th harmonic [closed]

The statement is as follows: The function that describes a standing wave on a fixed string at both ends is given by $y(x, t) = 2A \sin (kx) \cos (\omega t)$, where $A = 1.5\ \mathrm{cm}$, $k = 0.3\ ...
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How do LF Radio waves send data?

Excuse me I am a complete beginner. If LF radio waves are sent with let’s say frequencies of 100 kHz, how can data be modulated to that signal considering the signal is so long? For example, how can ...
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sound waves , standing waves,wind chimes [closed]

I don't know how to approach this problem. It's been bothering me for months. The answer seems to be the rod with shortest length
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How does spot size of a laser depend on wavelength?

Does the spot size of a laser depend on wavelength? We have a laser source that is fed into a spectrometer to set the wavelength we want. No other optics are used after the spectrometer. I was going ...
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Planck equation in terms of frequency [duplicate]

Given $$u (\lambda) d\lambda = \frac{8 \pi hc \lambda ^{-5}}{e^{\frac {hc}{\lambda k t}}-1}d\lambda,$$ I want to convert this into frequency form $u(\nu)d \nu$. Basically, I want to covert the amount ...
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De Broglie Wavelength of a particle at the turning point of a fountain

If you think about an atom which is launched in some kind of straight fountain, upward in the gravitational field. At the turning point the velocity and therefore the momentum of the particle seems to ...
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What are the factors on which wavelength of X-rays depends upon? [closed]

So the thing is that I was learning about X-rays and I came across this line that minimum wavelength of continuous X-ray spectra depends only upon Anode voltage about which I'm sceptical because $$eV=...
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Wavelenghs less than Planck Length [duplicate]

Okay all you heavy physics people, be nice. I'm a retired layperson doing some reading. My question is this : at present technology, can we detect (even if we can't measure precisely) wavelengths ...
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What happens when the DeBroglie wavelength becomes smaller than the Planck length?

A particle around the size of a grain of salt would have a DeBroglie wavelength close the plank length. Does this mean quantum phenomena become hidden for larger particles since a DeBroglie wavelength ...
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Can an electron pass through a gap smaller than an electron?

If an electron (photon) can pass through a gap smaller than an electron (photon) then it is a wave otherwise it it a particle. Is this a correct way of reasoning?
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Why do hot objects tend to emit shorter wavelength? [closed]

So how do the temperature and wavelength related and why do hot objects tend to emit shorter wavelength?
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Why are bend losses higher at higher wavelengths in fiber optic cables?

I have been researching the effect of wavelength on macro-bend losses for my extended essay (a 4000 word paper on a subject of your choice, high school level) on fiber optic cables. I asked this ...
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Efficient generation of infrasound

It seems that the most common sources of infrasound are earthquake, tsunami, volcano eruption, etc, which are all large scale behaviors. Why is it difficult for a human to generate infrasound? Is ...
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Property of light in different media?

Shouldn't keeping a colored frame in front a flash light ( white light ) change its wavelength or frequency?But I have also learned that light doesn't change its frequency when going from one medium ...
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Looking for something to reflect ultraviolet light at extremely low wavelengths [closed]

I am looking for some sort of mirror that will reflect ultraviolet light at extremely small wavelengths (200-250 nm). The main purpose of it is to amplify the ultraviolet light and cause it to spread. ...
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A question on the properties of wave equations

When you change $$y(x,t)=A\sin(kx-ωt+φ) $$ into $$y(x,t)=A\sin(2kx-2ωt+φ), $$ does it double the wavelength because $k$ changes into $2k$ and double the frequency since ω is doubled? If this is ...
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How do we know electron have wavelength?

I know many people thought that light is a wave in the past before Einstein came along but what about electron, the scattering experiment could only hint at their existence so how do they know that ...
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Does glass convert light wavelength?

I heard that when sunlight enters house through windows, it gets converted into longer wavelengths and gets trapped inside. So does the glass have anything to do with this or is this about heated ...
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Wavelength and relativity

From de Broglie equation λ=h/p. But p=mv and velocity is a relativistic quantity so also wavelength is relative ? In other words does wavelength depends on the reference frame ?
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Why we do not use $v=f \lambda$ for the waves associated with particles?

As the waves travel with velocity $$v= f \lambda,$$ where $v$ is velocity, $f$ is frequency and $\lambda$ is wavelength. Here we can see that velocity of wave is directly proportional to wavelength. ...
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How the intensity of light is related to the light wavelength?

Light can be seen as a wave or a particle. Light as a wave is well described by Maxwell's theory. Light energy relates to its wavelength and momentum too. However, if we treat light as a particle what ...
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Paragraph from a Stephen Hawking's Book (Uncertainty Principle)

This is from a Stephen Hawking's Book (Uncertainty Principle). I would like to know how does the Uncertainty Principle impose a limit on the size. What does he mean? From Hawking's book: It turns ...
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What is the difference between Wien's Displacement Law for peak frequency vs peak wavelength?

While doing research for a high school report I came across the fact that WDL actually has two forms, one for peak frequency and one for peak wavelength, and that these two forms are not the same and ...
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How Negative Color Value is accepted in Tristimulus Values for Mixing Colors?

I read a chapter about Trichromatic Theory of Color Mixture (Yao Wang, et all. 2001), about how we can produce most colors by mixing 3 primary colors. And the amount of three primary colors required ...
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Black body/Sun radiation - λmax

The Sun's effective temperature is 5778K. Using Wien's law we can calculate the wavelength λmax in which we observe the maximum amount of radiation received from the black body. After doing the ...
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How to derive derive De-Broglie's wavelength equation?

I was only yesterday learning about the De-Broglie equation $$\lambda = h/p, $$ I thought I understood it until I came across a question similar to this Now I always knew that photons don't have any ...
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Converting $\mathrm{ps/nm}$ to $\mathrm{ps}^2$

I have a dataset in the unit $\mathrm{ps/nm}$ for many different $\lambda$ which I want to convert to $\mathrm{ps}^2$. I guess I can assume that I only deal with Gaussian bandwidths such that $1\ \...
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Could electrons with a certain wavelength pass through a hole, or chamber, smaller than their wavelength? [duplicate]

I always thought, an electron could not pass through a hole, with a diameter, which is smaller than its wavelength. Just like microwaves could not pass through a metal mesh with small holes, but ...
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Is there such a material that only emits, or “sends out” the same color light that was “taken in” (absorbed)?

For example, glow-in-the-dark materials (photoluminescent) only emit a green hue regardless of the color of the light shone on the material. Is there such a material that emits the color of the light ...
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What is the physical interpretation of dividing $2\pi$ by a variable?

Looking at the angular wavenumber eqn: $$k = \frac{2\pi}{\lambda} = \frac{2\pi\nu}{v_p} = \frac{\omega}{v_p}$$ I'm curious what it means to divide $2\pi$ by the wavelength and why $2\pi$ was chosen....
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Percentage increase in wavelength leads to percentage decrease in energy. (Compton effect)

In this question: What percentage increase in wavelength leads to a 75% loss of photon energy in a photon-free electron collision? My understanding of this question is that $0.25\times E_i = E_f$, ...
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In order to observe a structure of length order of 1 femtometer, how large kinetic energy must the electron have?

According to the de Broglie relation, $\lambda=h/p$ where $h$ is the (not reduced) Planck Constant and $p$ is the magnitude of the relativistic 3-momentum. So, it should be that $\lambda$ should be ...
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De-Broglie wavelength from two different reference frames

If we were to measure the De-Broglie wavelength of a particle of mass $m$ and velocity $v$, in a given reference frame, it would be given as $$\lambda = h/p$$ (where $h$ is Planck's constant & $p$ ...
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Dispersion and wavelength

Why does dispersion increase with wavelength? If I understand correctly, refractive index is decreasing with wavelength. As a result, greater wavelengths are traveling faster. How does this cause the ...
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Does reflection preserve wavelength?

If a photon at a certain wavelength gets reflected on a surface, does the reflected photon have exactly the same wavelength? If not, what is the distribution of its wavelength? I know about up- and ...
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The relation between speed and wavelength

I was taught categorically that the velocity of a wave depends only on the medium in which it travels. Now I just stumbled upon a sentence + formula that declares that "the velocity of sinus-waves ...
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Photon frequency when transitioning from one medium to another

$E=h\nu$ where $\nu$ is frequency and $h$ is Planck's constant. The frequency, wavelength and speed are related as $c=\lambda\nu$. When transitioning from one medium to another the speed decreases by ...
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Can the em wave pass through matter obstacles and how?

I know about Faraday's cage, and another screens, but I do not understand the physics of this processes. Well, I know that the atoms are almost empty, so there are a lot of free space to em waves to ...
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How to convert cm$^{-1}$ to eV?

I know that $1 \:\mathrm{cm}^{-1} = 8065.54429 \:\mathrm{eV}$. I know that wave-number has unit $\:\mathrm{cm}^{-1}$ and that $E=hc\times \mathrm{wavenumber}$. But how do I arrive to the number $...
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What is the largest wavelength that can excite an atom?

What is the largest wavelength that can excite an atom? Or is there even a largest wavelength?
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Contradiction on the behavior of refractive index

The refractive index is given by: $$ n = \sqrt{\mu_r \epsilon_r} $$ This equation is symmetric about wavelength and is same for all wavelength of light i.e. since $\mu_r$ and $\epsilon_r$ are ...
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Can elementary particles be confined to a smaller region then their Compton wavelength?

I have read this question: Elementary particle (electron) and non-elementary (proton) spagettification and the comments where it says: But no real elementary particle can be confined in a region ...