Questions tagged [wavelength]

The wavelength of a sinusoidal wave is the spatial period of the wave—the distance over which the wave's shape repeats, and the inverse of the spatial frequency or wavenumber. Determined by considering the distance between consecutive corresponding points of the same phase, such as crests. Use for wavenumber, wavelength, frequency.

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Is there a limit for passing of classical waves behind a slit?

For the classical waves is there a limit for them to pass through a slit when the dimentions of the slit are much smaller then the wavelength? I think that the Hyugence principle must be valid and ...
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Is there any end to the electromagnetic spectrum? [duplicate]

Is there any theoretical end to the electromagnetic spectrum…
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What is the wavelength of light in a practical sense?

Okay, so I know that a wavelength is a distance of crest and a trough added together which makes a whole wave, but what is it in the real sense? Like in the case of sound I know when we say "...
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Does microwaves nevertheless pass through smaller slits?

It is known that the Foucault currents prevent the microwaves to leave a microwave oven (MWO). The waves can not pass tru several times smaller openings than their wavelength because the grid of the ...
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What happens to the time period when refraction occurs? [duplicate]

I was studying light and had a doubt that when refraction occurs (rarer to denser just assuming) then frequency remains same but lambda (wavelength) and velocity decrease. But I cant quite figure out ...
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Can you explain me the definition of wave number as defined in theoretical physics?

Wavenumber, as used in spectroscopy and most chemistry fields, is defined as the number of wavelengths per unit distance. The corresponding formula is $$k=\frac{1}{\lambda}.$$ However, in theoretical ...
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Huygens principle and small aperture

Does Huygens principle depend on the ratio of the wavelength and the dimension of the aperture? Do waves extinguish themselves by ratio 10 or more due to interference, e.g. will the wave pass through ...
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Number of Fringes obtained on Interference of Lights of different Wavelengths

The Question goes as follows: I am stuck at the part where we obtain General Equation for Path Difference of two Interfering Lights. Since Wavelength of those Interfering Lights are different, so I ...
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Are gamma rays the limit of the frequency photons can attain, and if yes, why? [duplicate]

Recalling that the Planck constant is $6.62607015 \times 10^{-34} m^2kg/s$ and taking into account the formula $E=hf$, for the energy of photons, we can rapidly derive the energy of gamma rays, which ...
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Light as a wavelength [closed]

I am learning that light is an electromagnetic wave, does this wave travel in every direction simultaneously from the source of light? I am trying to visualize this concept but I haven’t seen an ...
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From discrete to continuous superposition of waves, what happens to omega?

The Wikipedia page on group velocity uses the superposition of two cosines (of slightly different wavenumbers and angular frequencies) to show that group velocity $v_g = \frac{d\omega}{dk}.$ The sum ...
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Frequency and length

Why is pitch inversely proportional to length of an instrument? I think i know meaning of frequency but if anyone can also explain frequency according to higher level physics it shall be great.
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How can both of these versions of Wien's displacement law be correct? [duplicate]

I'm reading Bohren's "Fundamentals of Atmospheric Radiation" and I'm finding one of the points in the first chapter troubling. The author introduces Planck's distribution, both in terms of $\...
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Difference between de Broglie wavelength and electromagnetic wavelength?

So we have to find the ratio of wavelength of electrons in 1st and 4th orbit of an atom. Why do we have to use de Broglie wavelength and not $E = \frac{h c}{\lambda}$ ?
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Deriving Wien's approximation

Without Planck's law from where and how could one empirically get this. Could it be got from power is proportional to fourth power of temperature.
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Do macroscopic particles make quantum movements? [duplicate]

According to de broglie, all particles: macroscopic and microscopic have wave motion. So is their movement included in quantum physics? If not, then how does the Newton's first law and de broglie ...
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Speed of the Standing Wave in A Pipe

I’m studying standing waves and I got stuck with this question. The answer key says ‘A’ is the correct answer, but I think ‘B’ is the correct answer. My reasoning. The speed of the wave depends on the ...
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Does, and if so, why does the frequency of light and wavelength of light affect the photoelectric current?

It makes sense that intensity of light affects the photoelectric current, but what about the frequency and wavelength, given that intensity remains constant? The formula for intensity would be I = nhf/...
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Is frequency inversely proportional to wavelength Squared?

In our QM intro class our professor was introducing us to concepts of energy, momentum, frequency, wavelength etc of photons an electrons, On one side of the board he had the various expressions for ...
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Equivalence of two equations for relativistic wavelength

I have seen two equations for the relativistic De Broglie wavelength of a particle, I understand how each one is derived but I am struggling to show that they are equivalent. $$λ_r=mv/√(1-v^2/c^2 )$$ $...
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Is there a name for this type of wavevector?

When we say wavevector we often mean a vector $\mathbf k$ that is related to the direction and wavelength of a plane wave, given by $e^{i\,\mathbf k\cdot\mathbf x}$. I have to write something about ...
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EM scattering cross section, antenna directivity and its interpretation

The formula (35.25), see Slater, $\bar A_r = \frac{\lambda^2}{4\pi}$ is probably the most important formula in radar and/or antenna engineering. It says that the average absorbing cross section of ...
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Sound of string in a guitar

I study about waves and I learn that the velocity of a transverse wave in a string depends only on the tension and the density of the string. The frequency depends only on the source (whatever ...
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How does thermal wavelength work exactly?

In many sources it is stated that the thermal wavelenth indicates the rough size of the atom. It is then stated that this wavelenght is the de-Broglie wavelength of a particle with a momentum with the ...
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If a human was moving fast enough how bright would the blue-shifted heat be? Would it be detectable by an average human eye on an average night?

I guess another way to answer this question would be if our eyes had the capability to detect the peak black-body wavelength that is emitted by humans would it be enough radiation to detect if we were ...
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Why does not the speed of sound in air depend on frequency and wavelength? [duplicate]

I have read that speed of longitudinal waves depends upon the frequency and wavelength and, but why it doesn't happen with sound waves in air? And if velocity of sound doesn't depend upon the ...
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Why is the resolution of a tunneling microscope not limited by the wavelength of the electrons?

Why is the resolution of a tunneling microscope not limited by the wavelength of the electrons? Is it impossible for the electrons that are tunneling across the gap to appear somewhere in the gap, ...
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Determining the wavelength of the eigenfunctions of momentum

Self studying QM and working through an example of eigenfunctions of a continuous spectrum - the momentum operator, $\hat{p}$. In the example we've derived the normalized eigenfunctions to be $f_{p}(...
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3 votes
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How to measure the wavelength of a laser? [duplicate]

I'm building an enclosure for a laser engraver that emits light at ~455nm. I want to be able to measure the wavelength of the light that is refracting off the item being engraved. I would want to be ...
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What is the distribution of different wavelengths in single ray of white light? Does it remain constant?

Given the sun as the source of light for the above question, does the incident of different visible wavelengths same on a given surface, at a particular time and duration, even if the sun is rotating ...
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Absorption spectra Oxygen vs temperature

Whilst recently commissioning a spectroscopic Tunable diode laser "Oxygen Analyser" on a waste-to-energy plant, I wondered how the Analyser (which fires a narrow wavelength laser across the ...
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I have seen people define frequency or amplitude in two ways, which one is correct?

I have a doubt on frequency and amplitude,I have seen people define these things in 2 ways,for instance, people define frequency in mainly 2 ways,if we draw a pressure-position graph of a sound wave,...
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7 votes
3 answers
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What is the frequency of the sound?

Can someone tell me what is the frequency of the sound waves? Is it the number of compression or rarefaction going through in a second or the number of vibrations of the particles of the medium ...
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Is energy rule violated here? [closed]

We know that for an EM radiation , energy is given by : $$E = \frac{hc}{\lambda}$$ . Where $h$ is Planck's constant , $c = 300000000$m/s and $\lambda$ is wavelength of the radiation. Clearly, energy ...
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Where does the 1.22 come from in Rayleigh criterion for circular apertures?

For the formula 1.22, $\lambda/b$, which describes the angle at which resolution occurs, where does the 1.22 come from? I have looked at the derivation and there doesn't seem to be any explanation?
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2 votes
2 answers
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What exactly happens, step by step, in string harmonics?

I know that a string when plucked shows harmonics but I do not really understand how. Like, I understand resonating air column and how standing waves are formed there, but I can't seem to get the step ...
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1 vote
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What defines an 'object' with regards to particle-wave duality?

If any object, such as a ball, can exhibit wave behavior, I am confused about how such an object is defined. Does a ball itself have a wavelength? Does every single atom that composes it have a ...
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Difference between wavelengths relation to frequency and period relation to frequency

I know that: $\frac{1}{T} = f$ For some oscillation or sinusoidal wave. For instance, a period of 2 has a frequency of 1/2 And, in the physics I have taken the formula would be like the one given ...
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Waves and oscillation [duplicate]

Maxima and and minima of sound wave at given time represents air density (maxima represents compression) similarly. How does these curved lines over the water surface represent variation of air ...
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1 answer
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How to visualize the frequency of a satellite?

For a satellite I know the period T and frequency f = 1/T. For instance, for an earth skimming satellite with period ...
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Are longer wavelength flash "fuzzy" ? (Feynman lecture Vol 3 chap 1)

I am reading Feynman lecture volume 3 , Chapter 1. https://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/III_01.html#Ch1-S8 (search "fuzzy" in page to find the concerning paragraph.) I'll quote the ...
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4 votes
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What is exactly mean by wavelength in De Broglie equation?

I'm wondering what exactly is meant by the wavelength in De Broglie formula $p=\frac{h}{\lambda}$, where $p$ is the momentum of a particle and $\lambda$ is the wavelength. I know that a wave function ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
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If frequency of light never changes, is there finite number of blue light, red light, etc.?

AFAIK light's frequency cannot change. If that is the case, would it mean that there is a finite amount of every frequency floating around in the universe? ie. some finite number of 400hz light rays, ...
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If ultrasonic waves have such large wavelengths, then how can they be used to sense such small details?

We use the properties of waves for sensing. This includes electromagnetic waves, such as in lasers, but also mechanical waves, such as sound. And one of the primary factors that determine how useful a ...
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4 votes
3 answers
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How to derive this angular shift formula, $\lambda_\theta=\lambda_0\left[1-\frac{\eta^0}{\eta^*}\sin^2\theta\right]^{1/2}$ for interference filters?

I came across this formula from this optical coatings website $$\lambda_\theta=\lambda_0\left[1-\frac{\eta^0}{\eta^*}\sin^2\theta\right ]^{1/2}\tag{1}$$ Where $\lambda_\theta$ is the peak wavelength ...
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2 votes
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Two waves having same wavelength

Is it possible for two wave to have same wavelength but different speed and frequency? According to $C=λ×f$, if wavelength is constant, then frequency must be proportional to speed. My explanation is :...
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Is the phase velocity infinite for a matter wave with group velocity zero?

The Wikipedia article on matter waves describes the dependency between phase velocity $v_p$ and group velocity $v$ as $$ v_p = \frac{c^2}{v} $$ So for group velocity $v=0$ the phase velocity is ...
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De Broglie relations use which frequency or frequencies of a wave packet?

The Wikipedia article about matter waves lists the De Broglie relation for the frequency $f$ of a matter wave as $$ E = hf = \hbar\omega $$ with Planck constant $h$, total energy $E$ and angular ...
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Frequency dependence of far field condition

I am analyzing accelerometer data collected at a drill rig, at the top of the drill string. The drill bit acts an acoustic source; the acoustic waves travel through the drill pipe from the bit to the ...
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Can Wavelength also be used as Circumference?

Could Lights wavelength be the result of the electron orbits and its distance? Could this be why wavelength and orbit circumference measurements are the same? This would imply that wavelength radius ...
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