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Questions tagged [wave-particle-duality]

Use this tag for questions relating to the "wave-nature of particles" or the "particle-nature of waves" as they are often discussed in quantum mechanics, where a single object has properties of both classical particles and classical waves.

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73 views

Understanding quantum mechanics [on hold]

Forgive me for this dumb question but what are matter waves of particles? are they particles being spread out in a space like waves or the particles are still "particles" but matter waves are ...
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49 views

In Young's doublte slit experiment what happens if instead of cylindrical , spherical wavefront are taken?

Specifically in case of wavefront developed similar to wavefront developed by a convex or a concave lens .(essentially getting converging or diveging beam of light ) Do we see straight strips of dark ...
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2answers
98 views

What does it actually mean for an electron to be excited? [duplicate]

I've been confused on the connection between photons and electrons for a very long time. Some examples of questions I"ve asked are linked here: What produces higher frequency light? Frequency of ...
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3answers
58 views

How to live-project a large, high-visibility double slit interference pattern?

I want to do a double-slit interference pattern for a lobby display. I've done double slits many times in classrooms and labs. They're small and not highly visible. I'd like to make the pattern ...
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1answer
52 views

Should particle-wave duality be understood as a description of light's dual nature or as a description of two observable states of light?

In double slit experiments, light is observed in two distinct conditions (no measurement of trajectory / measurement of trajectory) that bring two different results (no interferences / interferences). ...
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2answers
87 views

What are the key differences between a particle and a wave?

When do we call something a particle, and when do we call something a wave? Do we call something a particle when it is highly localized? If that's right, then a wave packet is a particle. Do we call ...
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1answer
128 views

In quantum mechanics, which concept caters for light rays?

If photon wavefunctions are omnidirectional and don't have a definite size, how comes those from the Sun don't all collapse on Mercury and some do actually reach Earth ? I understand that ...
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1answer
42 views

Why the energy and momentum conservation equations do not include terms reflecting the particle nature of the photons? [closed]

It is well known that light has a dual nature. However, the energy and momentum conservation equations embody the wave aspect of light but not the material aspect of the photon. Should there be ...
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1answer
49 views

Wave particle duality [duplicate]

Can someone please explain wave particle duality for large bodies? Why don't large bodies exhibit wave like nature for example if I am walking with some momentum, the wavelength associated with me is $...
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1answer
44 views

Finding momentum amplitude of a wave packet when initial wave form is given

At time $t = 0$, a one-dimensional free wave packet for a particle of mass $m$ takes the form: $$ \Psi(x,0) = \begin{cases} \frac{1}{\sqrt{L}}e^{i\alpha x} & \text{for } -L/2 < x < +L/2 \\ ...
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1answer
112 views

Is width of particles a consequence of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle?

The uncertainty principle tells us that $$\sigma_x\sigma_p \geq \frac{\hbar}{2}, $$ which means that the more precisely we measure a particle's position, the more imprecise we will know its momentum. ...
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1answer
35 views

Which aspect of light does an ordinary photometer consider?

Most photo detectors uses the wave aspect of light while measuring the intensity of any incident radiation , thus yielding a value in $\text{W/cm}^2$ , also there are photo detectors that shows the ...
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2answers
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Why does a particle, e.g. a proton, at rest have $v=0$?

Given the formula $E=mc^2$, the mass is equivalent to energy through the speed of light. This equation is also the special case of $E^2=(mc^2)^2+(pc)^2$ when $p=0$. Thus, it is at rest respectively ...
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Wave-like and particle-like nature [duplicate]

My notes say Radiation emitted from any source moves discontinuously in form of small packets of energy. Each packet is called quantum. Does this mean that when light travels, it is actually a ...
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21 views

Bohr’s Quantisation Condition [duplicate]

I am a grade 12 student from India and my physics textbook does not delve deep in the bohrs quantisation condition but has given us a paragraph to figure out what it is: “Consider Motion of an ...
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4answers
149 views

How can light be made up of particles?

In order to explain photoelectric effect, Einstein suggested that light is made up of photons, but I don't understand how could this have made sense when you know that light is an electromagnetic ...
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1answer
37 views

Wavelength of a particle [duplicate]

As we know wavelength of a particle is equal to (Planck's constant / momentum), so here momentum $= mv$ where $m$ is a mass of an object and $v$ is the velocity of an object. What will happen when ...
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2answers
79 views

What are the properties of light in the wave/ particle theory that map to properties we physically observe?

When we see two beams of light of different colours, what is different about them in the wave theory? And what is different about the photons that make up each of them? When we see two beams of light,...
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1answer
32 views

Application in medical field

I have heard about many new developments in radiotherapy for treating cancer/tumors such as hadron therapy but why can't we use wave interference for it? Incoming waves could interfere destructively ...
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1answer
68 views

A doubt regarding Planck's quantum theory [duplicate]

I am a beginner and I have a problem regarding Planck's Quantum Theory The following is one of the postulate of Planck's Quantum Theory 1) The energy of each quantum is directly proportional to ...
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1answer
70 views

Diffraction pattern of X-ray and electron

Electron diffraction is used to study about wave - particle duality of matter. A beam of electrons directed at a single crystal produced a diffraction pattern like an X-ray diffraction pattern. I ...
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2answers
65 views

Does everything have frequency?

I know that every object have a dual property but the wave nature is not observed because of their size. But in the photoelectric effect, light is not considered as a wave then how can we talk about ...
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3answers
146 views

Are superposition quantum systems really in two pure states at once?

I know that quantum systems can have properties of waves as well as those of particles. Also, I know that the mathematical description of quantum states is probabilistic, i.e. $$\Psi = \frac{1}{\sqrt{...
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2answers
81 views

Is there a 5th fundamental force which may be responsible for the behavior of matter to be wave or a particle?

We already know about the 4 fundamental forces in nature which are gravitational,electromagnetic,weak nuclear and strong nuclear forces. There are several other questions on this website which are ...
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1answer
132 views

Is there a sharp distinction between particles and fields?

The quantisation of the electromagnetic field, proposed originally by Planck, blurs the distinction between particles and fields. 'Point' particles become fuzzy and subject to a wave equation. Also, ...
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2answers
86 views

What is electromagnetic radiation (when it is not a 'wave' of EM fields or interacting locally as a photon)?

My questions are related to the question asked at Are EM radiation and EM waves the same thing?. My background is in math (my Ph.D. thesis was in geometric analysis), and I have only taken basic ...
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1answer
105 views

Dark Matter Wave Particle Duality

CERN is looking for dark photons, and they are seeking to look for interactions with the Higgs boson with the dark photon.See link here. So in other words a dark photon - a mediator for dark matter is ...
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2answers
60 views

What experiment would confirm De Broglie equation on photons?

If we want to check experimentally that, for a photon: λ=h/p (De Broglie equation) Has such experiment been carried out? What is/would be the experimental setup? Wikipedia doesnt show such protocol ...
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1answer
101 views

Question on de Broglie hypothesis [duplicate]

I have read about de Broglie hypothesis that matter like light can also exhibit wave particle duality. This gave rise to the following questions in my mind. The wavelength for electrons is ...
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3answers
118 views

What is particle spin in terms of waves? [duplicate]

If particles are waves, then what really is spin?
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3answers
134 views

How are classical and quantum momentum related in an intuitive manner?

I know that quantum momentum is inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probability or matter wave of a given particle, but I don't get how this relation of this abstract mathematical ...
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1answer
47 views

Does wave-particle duality rely on accepting the Copenhagen interpretation?

If you're a scientist that subscribes to the many worlds theorem, does that mean you do not accept wave particle duality? Seeing as MW postulates that the wave or particle form has always existed that ...
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23 views

Clarification on Phase wave derivation in De Broglie's paper

De Broglie's paper refers to his theorem A periodic phenomenon is seen by a stationary observer to exhibit the frequency $ν_1=h^{-1}m_0c^2\sqrt{1-\beta^2}$ that appears constantly in phase ...
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1answer
52 views

Wave packet in dispersive medium, how will the group velocity be affected? [closed]

A wave packet with center frequency ω is propagating in dispersive medium with phase velocity of 1.5 x 10^3 m/s. When the frequency ω is increased by 2%, the phase velocity is found to decrease by 3%. ...
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2answers
52 views

Wave antiparticle duality

Can an antiparticle such as the antiparticle of an electron - a positron exhbit wave particle duality. We know from de Broglie, and the Davisson-Germer experiment in which we fire electrons from an ...
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1answer
43 views

Strange strong interference/noise in radio waves [closed]

Good night, Since 2014 when I bought my car I use a FM transmitter inside it to play my bluetooth musics, to escape for every radio in city I put the radio to work in the highest frequency it works ...
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1answer
50 views

Quantum objects duality between waves and particles

i am reading an intresting book titled "Life on the edge: the coming age of quantum biology". And the subject of "quantum objects duality between waves and particles" takes a big part of this book. I ...
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11answers
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How does light 'choose' between wave and particle behaviour?

Light exhibits wave behaviour in phenomenon such as interference but particle behaviour in the photoelectric effect. How does light 'choose' where to be a wave and where to be a particle?
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1answer
48 views

Does Dual Nature mean that any wave will have a particle counterpart? [duplicate]

Does Dual Nature mean that any wave will have a particle counterpart? electrons have electron waves and light waves are made up of photons. Does this mean all kinds of waves have its particle ...
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1answer
27 views

Interpreting wave-particle duality due to wave crests [closed]

I have been thinking a lot about the double slit experiment and am wondering whether any theorist has ever considered the following interpretation for wave-particle duality: Could the reason we ...
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3answers
67 views

Can light particles be the medium in which another wave travel through?

So, I was thinking about how light wave something act like particles, and I thought, if light is made of particles, couldn’t a mechanical-like wave travel through it? Is this possible, and in what ...
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1answer
46 views

Driving force and mean of a particle wave function [duplicate]

I am currently undergoing a course on introduction to quantum mechanics and we took the historical approach. I'm currently at DeBroglie wavelength. He introduces the wave particle duality in matter, ...
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0answers
75 views

What are Bohmian trajectories for a free electron?

A free electron, or any other quantum particle, has an uncertain position/momentum, according to Heisenberg uncertainty principle. The squared amplitude of the wavefunction determines the probability ...
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1answer
83 views

Is this a correct argument why $c$ is the cosmic speed limit, and what does it mean for the speed of massless particles? [closed]

I am now in my second bachelor, taking both an electrodynamics and a quantum mechanics course. This made me think of an argument to explain why particles cannot exceed the speed of light. So far I ...
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2answers
43 views

In a pilot-wave model, is knowing the position of the particle sufficient for predicting its behavior?

Suppose that we somehow exactly know the position of an electron before hitting the double-slit structure (for example we know it's 20cm away from the structure and it's closer to the left slit). In ...
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2answers
62 views

How do quantized photons interact in an interferometer?

Since light is quantized into photons, how can a single rare photon entering one side of a large, [say, 100 meter wide], interferometer from a very dim star, a phton which is only in the ...
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1answer
56 views

What is “quantized momentum transfer”, and can it account for the double-slit experiment?

In https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378437109010401, the author claims that the interference pattern obtained in the double-slit experiment does not need a wave description of ...
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3answers
185 views

Double Slit Experiment : Photon vs Electron

are the following statements correct: For Young's double slit experiment with electrons, the separation between two slits has to be smaller than the position uncertainty of the electrons. But no ...
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0answers
26 views

Question about the diffraction of electrons

This question concerns the diagram on the left. This is the set up. My question is that, why is collector current not an increasing function of the KE of the electrons? I can understand the graph ...
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0answers
25 views

Why is a maximum value of current observed in Davison and Germer's experiment?

While studying matter waves, we were discussing Davison and Germer's experiment on electron diffraction when we learnt that a maximum value of current (measuring the intensity of electron diffraction) ...