Skip to main content

Questions tagged [wave-particle-duality]

Use this tag for questions relating to the "wave-nature of particles" or the "particle-nature of waves" as they are often discussed in quantum mechanics, where a single object has properties of both classical particles and classical waves.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-2 votes
0 answers
34 views

Why do we take $v_{rms}$ speed in de Broglie wavelength not average speed for a gas? [closed]

While solving many questions, I came across many solutions where we took v as vrms speed for de broglie wavelength of a gas but why can't we take v as average speed as it would give us average ...
S K's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
2 answers
101 views

What exactly does it mean for two bosons to be in the same state?

If I understand QM correctly, it's a fact that two bosons can have the same wave function in principle. What I'm wondering is if the particles governed by the wave functions can also be in the same ...
Francisco Skrobola's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

How can the attraction of opposite electric charges be explained by the exchange of virtual photons? [duplicate]

Sometimes, the electric force between two electrically charged particles is explained by the analogy of two freely floating astronauts that start throwing a ball towards each other. In this analogy, ...
a_guest's user avatar
  • 300
1 vote
1 answer
235 views

Double-slit experiment with Buckyballs

Is it true that in the double-slit experiment with Buckyballs, performed in 1999 at the University of Vienna by Anton Zeilinger, a crystal (which scatters the launched molecules) was used instead of a ...
Pavel Borisov's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
39 views

Can only a collection of photons create light with a direction?

I assume that any individual photon spreads in all direction of space, resembling a circular wave. So, a single photon cannot have a specific direction of travel. Consequently, light with a direction ...
QuantumQuasar's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
31 views

Behavior of a single emitted photon [duplicate]

Suppose you have a transmitter sending out a single photon. If you think about this photon as a wave, you will see a circular wave moving away from the transmitter. Over millennia, this wave spreads ...
QuantumQuasar's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Why do Compton scattering plots all exhibit $(1 - cos\theta)$ shape? [closed]

I continue to study the formula for Compton scattering. From Compton wavelength formula Eq.1, we can express $E_f$ in terms of $E_i$ as: $$ E_f = \frac{E_i}{1+\frac{E_i}{m_e c^2}(1-cos\theta)} \tag{7} ...
Leon Chang's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
53 views

Is the electromagnetic wave emitted during an atomic electron transition always sinusoidal, and why is there a spectral linewidth?

I recently engaged in a discussion regarding Planck's relation, which posits that the energy $E$ of a photon is directly proportional to its frequency $f$, symbolized as $E=hf$. The user @Sturrum on a ...
CuriousMind's user avatar
8 votes
6 answers
3k views

Where is the paradox in the double-slit experiment?

I'm aware of the fact that Feynman said something along the lines of "If you don't think QM is weird then you don't understand QM". So I'm pretty sure he is right and I am wrong :) Still, ...
Scarlain Stimolon's user avatar
3 votes
5 answers
218 views

Why Does Planck's Relation $E=hf$ Imply a Linear Relationship Only for Sinusoidal Frequency Bases?

I have been studying quantum mechanics and I came across Planck's relation which describes the energy $E$ of a photon as being directly proportional to its frequency $f$, with Planck's constant $h$ as ...
CuriousMind's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Dual nature of matter on macroscopic bodies like that of humans or anything

if matter has a dual nature and everything is made up of matter then why do macroscopic bodies like humans or trees or a cars is not showing wave motion like why are they static and not moving like a ...
Anugrah Sengar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
94 views

When light passes from one medium to another. Depending on the density, it would experience a change in velocity. Why would its vector change as well?

For example, when light passes through water its velocity decreases and refraction occurs. Why? Why is there a change in direction. If I slow down a car I don’t suddenly turn left.
A new learner's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
93 views

What is the relationship between an electron's wave-like and particle-like qualities? Is "Electrons are waves and particles" the whole truth? [duplicate]

Upon researching the double-slit experiment, it seems to me that electrons are somehow cloaked in wavelike behavior (not at all like my previous idea that electrons were waves and somehow were also ...
Ruchir Kavulli's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
49 views

Interference pattern of relativistic particles

I wanted to know if it is possible to perform a double slit experiment with electrons travelling at 0.99c as the wavelength is very short.
Pshyco's user avatar
  • 33
-2 votes
1 answer
49 views

Do particles, quarks, atoms really move in space, or is it field disturbance-wave that moves in S-T with speed $c$? How particles move in S-T in QFT? [closed]

As I understand particles are localized fields (16fields+g). Can you explain on hydrogen atom example that moves in space vacuum. Does it really moving, or it is continious field disturbance ...
Codeded's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
50 views

Electron Interference when produced by $W$ boson

Hi I was wondering about the following setup. Let’s say we have a radioactive atom which decays via beta decay which produces a $W$ boson. The $W$ boson has a chance of turning into an electron or a ...
EigenDragon16's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Single Photon Detection in a Moving Train of Detectors Setup

I’ve been pondering a thought experiment related to quantum mechanics and photon detection, and I’m curious about the theoretical outcome and whether any similar experiments have been conducted. ...
Alex Jonathan Henderson's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
182 views

Is each INDIVIDUAL photon a PHYSICAL wave? [closed]

Sigh. So I've scoured the internet for many many hours, on many many occasions... aaand, yeah. Is light: just ONE photon which acts like a physical wave as those seen in classical mechanics (if so, ...
Faalkar's user avatar
  • 69
1 vote
2 answers
100 views

In the double slit experiment, why doesn't the electron interact with the wall or plate with the slits and therefore act like a particle? [closed]

I always wondered if the electrons superposition is so fragile, why doesn't it interact with the wall or plate with the double slits? Do the slits have to be a certain size?
Harold's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
2 answers
161 views

Rigorous derivation of DeBroglie wavelength

I've scoured the internet as much as I can, and I've yet to find a rigorous derivation of the DeBroglie wavelength. They all go something like this: $$E=\gamma mc^2, \ \gamma \approx 1 \ \therefore\ E=...
JBatswani's user avatar
  • 187
2 votes
3 answers
117 views

Is there a wave model that describes absorption of electromagnetic radiation in matter?

I know that there is a particle model that describes the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in matter - A photon with energy E can excite ("absorbed") an atom if it has energy gap of ...
Levi Civita's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
75 views

Path lengths in the dual slit experiment and the speed of light

In the dual slit experiment, we can view the diffraction pattern as the constructive and destructive interference of two waves from the superposition of a single photon. If we analyse the paths ...
KDP's user avatar
  • 6,142
1 vote
0 answers
47 views

What exactly is matter wave?

Wavelength of matter wave is given by de-broglie as h/p. I want to know wavelength of what wave is being discussed, or specifically what is matter wave? Is it the 'group wave' that has same velocity ...
SHINU_MADE's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

How can we detect matter waves?

The DeBroglie wavelength associated with a moving object is $$\lambda = \frac hp$$ For an object of mass 200 grams traveling with a velocity 20 m/s, it is in the order of $10^{-34}$ m. Is current ...
SuperSexyTrash's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Particle physics question about uncertainty principle [duplicate]

I'm struggling with strong force interaction using particle-properties. In my book they give an example to explain this interaction using a Feynmandiagram of a proton and neutron and say that the ...
lynx_s's user avatar
  • 9
0 votes
2 answers
106 views

Is the nature of light determined? [duplicate]

Is it determined that light is a wave or a particle or it still exists as a dual nature? because young's experiment said that light is a wave but still I hear people saying that light shows both wave ...
Suchit Mehta's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
108 views

Relation between the wavelength and the particle-wave duality

I will go straight into an example. Let's take the case of an electron of mass $m$ confined in an infinite 1D box of width $a$. Solving the Schrödinger equation and pay attention to the boundary ...
Anky Physics's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
87 views

Why does there need to be a particle representation of light?

Why does there need to be a particle representation of light? Doesn't light as a wave explained the observations of the photoelectric perfectly? When the frequency of light is increased, the speed of ...
ThreadBucks's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
152 views

Wheeler’s delayed choice experiment — why can’t a photon select state multiple times?

I have a question regarding https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheeler%27s_delayed-choice_experiment. I am interested in knowing why quantum mechanics seems to be so fixated in thinking that photons in a ...
TGGR's user avatar
  • 41
-3 votes
3 answers
129 views

Is matter-wave a consequence of the uncertainty principle? [closed]

The position and momentum of a particle are undefined because of the uncertainty principle. Does this result in matter-wave with wavelength given by the following equation? $ \lambda ={\frac {h}{mv}} $...
iVenky's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
2 answers
122 views

How can we call matter to exist in wave form?

Matter behaves as "waves and particles". But if we say that the object is a wave it means it is present everewhere at the same time.
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
84 views

Does a particle still behave as a wave after being detected as a particle?

I just started learning about the intricacies of quantum mechanics in high school and aim to improve my understanding of the wave-particle duality of particles. I was wondering about different ...
spaghettyii's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
70 views

Does this explanation of wave-particle duality correspond with any existing formal explanation?

Imagine a tsunami wave. Out at sea, it slowly raises the water level not more than a few inches or feet, and passes by standing boats with barely any resultant turbulence. It moves very fast, but it's ...
hamstar's user avatar
  • 109
-2 votes
2 answers
159 views

Could the double slit experiment demonstrate not that particles behave like waves, but that together particles behave as a wave? [closed]

Clearly particles individually pass through slits, be it a single or a double slit experiment. The fact that wave interference is evident in their trajectory may be due to their interaction upon ...
Gilles Lamoureux's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
123 views

Photocurrent in Photoelectric effect and its misconceptions

This question has been asked many times on this site before with different doubts in each question but I am conflicted with the vast amount of sources stating contradictory things. There are many ...
Ham Lemon's user avatar
  • 201
0 votes
1 answer
326 views

De Broglie wavelength and the wave packets

Constructing a wave packet requires adding (superposing) many (if not infinite) plane waves of different wavevectors. A single plane wave has a well-defined wavelength, and hence, from de Broglie $$p =...
Anky Physics's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
112 views

Are particles and waves limits of quantum fields?

In quantum field theory we often hear that particles sometimes behave like waves and sometimes behave like particles. In quantum field theory we say particles are fundamentally fields. Is it correct ...
Depenau's user avatar
  • 525
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why are particles still a thing? [closed]

Couldn't we just assume that waves have mass and momentum and can become localized? Dirac Deltas can be given a rigorous mathematical foundation but physicist do not use the Gelfand triple. Why not ...
Lina Jane's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
197 views

Matter wave of macroscopic objects

By De-Broglie's hypothesis it can be said that every matter has a dual nature associated with it, and the relationship being: $$\lambda = \frac{h}{p}$$ Now by applying this relation on a macroscopic ...
Learner's user avatar
  • 63
0 votes
1 answer
159 views

Distance between two slits in the double slit experiment

I was looking at some problem set in MIT QM course, and noticed the following problem: Electrons of momentum $p$ fall normally on a pair of slits separated by a distance $d$. What is the distance, $w$...
SERich's user avatar
  • 103
0 votes
1 answer
199 views

What is the proper description of an electron?

Is it described by a trajectory with a spin $x^\mu(\tau)$, $S^\mu(\tau)$ OR a Grassmann-valued spinor field (i.e. the Dirac field a la path integral QFT) $\psi_a(x^\mu)$? If so, how are these two ...
Aakash Lakshmanan's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
23 views

Schrodinger's thought process about duality [duplicate]

How can a single particle be a wave? Always thought wave is defined as back-and-forth motion for single particle, or we have many particles, wave should be as passing energy from one particle to ...
Zaza Orji's user avatar
  • 137
1 vote
2 answers
117 views

On the level of Newton's particle theory of light

Huygens and Maxwell have wave theories about light. On the other hand Planck and Einstein have theories about particle nature of light and could explain blackbody radiation and photoelectric effect ...
moshtaba's user avatar
  • 1,409
0 votes
0 answers
106 views

How does shape of a wavefunction changes as it encounters a potential barrier?

A particle of mass and energy $E > 0$ in one dimension is scattered by the potential below If the particle was moving from $x = -\infty$ to $x= +\infty$, which of the following graphs gives the ...
Dinesh Katoch's user avatar
5 votes
5 answers
1k views

Does an electron pass through both slits in the double-slit experiment?

Double-slit experiment image source: Wikipedia The double-slit experiment can be regarded as a demonstration that light and matter can display characteristics of both classically defined waves and ...
Duke William's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
78 views

Davisson-Germer experiment

Davisson and Germer's experiment confirmed the wave-particle duality of matter. In this experiment a slowed down electron beam is reflected by the surface of a nickel crystal, which is able to split ...
user3713179's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
58 views

The relationship between the group velocity $v_{g}$ and the wave vector $k$?

I know from my quantum mechanics course that the moving particle moves with the group velocity of the wave packet $v_{g}$ and I also Know that the momentum of the particle is $\hbar k=p$ so it implies ...
amin's user avatar
  • 597
3 votes
2 answers
172 views

In the double slit experiment, when emitting one photon at a time, why don't all of them travel the same path?

If we fire one photon at a time, why don't all of the photons hit the barrier exactly in between the two slits? How come each photon goes in different directions? (some go through top slit, some go ...
Fuad's user avatar
  • 139
1 vote
5 answers
6k views

Why when not observed in the double slit experiment, do we see light in places we do not see light when observed?

The double slit experiment with a single electron provides a different result when observed and when unobserved. When unobserved we see an interference pattern, and when observed we just see 2 lines. ...
Mercury's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote
2 answers
132 views

How does dual nature of matter affect collision at the quantum level?

I have a question suppose having two fundamental particles collide which each other at the quantum scale , then what will the collision behave as Will the particle nature be dominant and make sure to ...
Razz's user avatar
  • 441

1
2 3 4 5
17