Questions tagged [tidal-effect]

The force on parts of an extended body in a non-uniform gravitational field, due to residual gravitational attraction between the overall effect on the body and the expected effect on the point in question. Tidal forces are most notably in large moons orbiting near their primaries.

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Does Earth really have two high-tide bulges on opposite sides?

The bit that makes sense – tidal forces My physics teacher explained that most tidal effect is caused by the Moon rotating around the Earth, and some also by the Sun. They said that in the Earth and ...
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Are tidal power plants slowing down Earth's rotation?

Are tidal power plants slowing down Earth's rotation to the speed of the orbiting moon? (1 rotation per 28 cca days) Are they vice versa increasing the speed of moon orbiting by generating some ...
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57 votes
9 answers
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Are we slightly lighter during the day and slightly heavier at night, owing to the force of the Sun's gravity?

Using $g = \frac{Gm}{r^2}$, the force on a point mass located at 1 AU from the Sun ($m = 2 \cdot 10^{30} \text{ kg}$) is about ~0.006 N/kg. Does that mean that, e.g., a 70 kg person is ~42g lighter ...
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17 votes
3 answers
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Why does the moon drift away from earth?

I once saw on TV that the moon is slowly drifting away from the earth, something like an inch a year. In relation to that the day on earth what also increase in time. I wonder why is that?
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32 votes
3 answers
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Why does the Moon face Earth with the same side?

I know that the rotation period of the moon equals its revolution period. It's just so astonishing that these 2 values have such a small difference. I mean, what is the probability of these 2 values ...
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Where does tidal energy come from?

Kind of an odd, random question that popped into my head. Tidal energy - earth's ocean movement, volcanism on some of Jupiter's moons, etc. - obviously comes from the gravitational interaction between ...
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16 votes
3 answers
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Thought Experiment - Poking a stick across a Black Hole's Event Horizon

The classical explanation of a black hole says that if you get to close, you reach a point - the event horizon radius - from which you cannot escape even travelling at the speed of light. Then they ...
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5 answers
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Do you really die if spaghettified by a black hole?

Considering gravity acts by stretching spacetime and all forces (EM, nuclear etc...) are relative to spacetime, can we then consider that regardless of how stretched you are to an observer outside the ...
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16 votes
12 answers
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Is the distance between the Sun and the Earth increasing?

$M$ = mass of the Sun $m$ = mass of the Earth $r$ = distance between the Earth and the Sun The sun is converting mass into energy by nuclear fusion. $$F = \frac{GMm}{r^2} = \frac{mv^2}{r} \...
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77 votes
7 answers
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Moon's pull causes tides on far side of Earth: why?

I have always wondered and once I even got it, but then completely forgot. I understand that gravity causes high and low tides in oceans, but why does it occur on the other side of Earth?
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4 votes
1 answer
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Spaghettification on an atomic scale?

Spaghettification occurs when an object approaches a singularity. As one comes close enough to the singularity, the gravity at the feet (if this is a human) is greater than that at the head, ...
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60 votes
5 answers
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Why is the Moon considered the major cause of tides, even though it is weaker than the Sun?

You have likely read in books that tides are mainly caused by the Moon. When the Moon is high in the sky, it pulls the water on the Earth upward and a high-tide happens. There is some similar effect ...
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14 votes
5 answers
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Is the lay explanation of the equivalence principle wrong?

The common explanation/trope for the equivalence principle always has something to do with you being inside an elevator or spaceship, and your supposed inability to differentiate, say, gravity from a ...
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When a planet is heated through gravitational pull, where is the energy taken from?

Jupiters moon Io is heated through the gravitational pull of Jupiter, but when Io is heated because of this, where does that energy come from? How does conservation of energy work for this effect, ...
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2 answers
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How does the Moon cause the tides?

I am considering the following question, but I can't quite figure it out... I have looked up differential gravity, but I cannot derive the equation for the effect on Earth, and I haven't found any ...
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Tidal force of Sun?

As I understand, satellites and the Moon orbiting Earth are in free fall. Isn't the same true for Earth orbiting the Sun? My question is then: How can the Sun's gravity affect tides? Aren't the ...
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Tidal affect on an object and the length contraction in Relativity Theory

According to the equivalence principle in general relativity theory; If an object are in free falling in a gravitational field,the object will not detect gravitational force on it. From this ...
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4 answers
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How come the Sun's gravity can hold distant planets in orbit, but cannot rip humans off Earth?

The sun is strong enough to keep gas giants close, but why not people?
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10 votes
3 answers
577 views

Will the increasing distance between Moon and Earth result in speeding up or slowing down of Earth's rotation period?

Problem The Moon tidally brakes Earth's rotation, and as a result distances itself away from Earth as a result of conservation of total angular momentum*. Certainly, tidal braking slows the rotation ...
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What would happen if the Earth was tidally locked with the Sun? [closed]

I'm thinking of writing a short story set on a version of Earth that is tidally locked to the Sun. I'm not exactly sure how to research the topic. Here's a number of questions about what would happen: ...
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3 answers
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Can we run out of gravitational (tidal) energy?

I read an article on energy forms and sources that made me think. Energy comes from somewhere and is limited in various senses. It's most obvious for fuels: we burn coal and oil and at some point we'...
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5 votes
2 answers
272 views

Trajectory of safe descent into a black hole

Is there any specific trajectory that an object can take in a black hole without it getting spaghettified? I am aware that the intance gravity of a black hole would rip apart any object if it falls ...
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2 answers
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Why Aren't Saturn's Rings Clumping into Moons?

While reading with my son about how a Mars-like planet collided with the early Earth that resulted in our current moon, it said the initial debris also formed a ring, but that ring ended up getting ...
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5 answers
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Does the moon affect the Earth's climate?

So, this morning I was talking to a friend about astronomical observations, and he told me that lately there has only been good weather when there was a full moon in the sky, which was a shame. I ...
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Can you tell just from its gravity whether the Moon is above or below you?

If you are on a place of Earth where the Moon is currently directly above or directly below you, you experience a slightly reduced gravitational acceleration because of Moon's gravity. This is what ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Would it be possible for a human to simply "step" through a traversable wormhole?

(For the purposes of a science-fiction story where the author is attempting to have as much basis in fact as possible) if one were to create or make use of a Morris-Thorne or similar traversable ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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Will extracting power from ocean tides affect the moon's orbit in the LONG run?

Conservation of energy says that any energy extracted from our ocean's tides would have to come from somewhere. Since these tides are a gravitational effect due to the moon, it would seem that the ...
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5 answers
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Why do we always see the same side of the Moon? [duplicate]

I am puzzled why we always see the same side of the Moon even though it is rotating around its own axis apart from revolving around the earth. Shouldn't this only be possible if the Moon is not ...
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8 votes
3 answers
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How long was a day at the creation of Earth?

Since the earth is slowing its rotation, and as far as I know, each day is 1 second longer every about 1.5 years, how long was an earth day near the formation of earth (4.5 billion years ago)? I ...
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7 votes
2 answers
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Can we get energy from the Earth's rotation?

Is there any way to harvest large amounts of energy from the Earth's rotation?
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4 votes
1 answer
265 views

How do the "tidal forces warming moons" theories hold when apart from heating from expansion, there may be also cooling from contraction?

I can understand a temporary heating, from the tital forces exerted on the moon but wouldn't there be cooling as well eventually when particles "give in" to contraction? Wouldn't they eventually net a ...
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1 answer
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Synchronized rotation of the moon

Does the moon rotates? Yes. The rotation matches exactly the orbit of the Earth. Which means in 28 days the moon makes one rotation. Shouldn't this be also happening with the Earth rotation around the ...
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2 votes
1 answer
245 views

Does the Earth gets closer to the Sun?

We know that the sun loses an amount of it's mass equivalent to the amount of energy it produces, according to the $E=mc^2$ equation. so the sun is losing mass every second. Does this affect the space-...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Will the Earth ever show synchronous rotation? Why and when?

In this answer to the question "why does the moon have the same rotation and revolution periods?", we read: The mass and speed of rotation of the Earth influence the moon in that some of its ...
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2 answers
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What happens to the water on the surface of the Earth if the Earth is not rotating about its axis in the Earth-Moon system?

Suppose the Earth is not rotating. As usual, the Moon follows its normal path around the Earth. Let's assume it's a circular motion and that there are no other gravitational influences. A test ...
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1 vote
1 answer
489 views

Why are tidal forces pointing away from the Moon? [duplicate]

I am currently reading The Science of Insterstellar, which explains most things very well, but some things leave me confuzzled, which I hope to get answers to here. I am no physicist, but highly ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is the gravitational tidal force equivalent to expanding space?

If you fall towards a black hole, the particles in front and the back of you, in the direction of the center, are accelerating away from you. So, seen from a freely frame, can we say that space is ...
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48 votes
4 answers
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Why do some location on Earth have only one tidal maximum per day instead of two?

Most places in the ocean have two high tides and two low tides per "day" (~25 hours). But I remember reading that some locations only have one of each per day. This answer has some great explanations ...
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3 answers
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Are there tides in the atmosphere?

Analogous to the tides of Earths oceans, do the Moon and Sun cause our atmosphere to bulge in what could be described as a low and high tide?
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1 answer
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Why is the orbital resonance of the Galilean moons stable?

It is well known that the orbits of Ganymede, Europa and Io are in a 4:2:1 resonance. Most online sources (including but not limited to Wikipedia) say that such an orbital resonance, along with the 3:...
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3 answers
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How quickly was the Earth rotating 250 million years ago?

The Earth is slowing at a rate of $4.7\times10^{-4}$ miles per second every 100 years due to tidal forces of the moon. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth%27s_rotation http://imagine.gsfc.nasa....
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19 votes
7 answers
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Why would black hole rip me apart?

According to my understanding of General Relativity, gravity is not a force and an observer which is falling freely under the influence of gravity should be considered inertial. Now, I have come ...
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6 votes
2 answers
655 views

Will an object falling into Earth's orbit start spinning?

Assume an object falls towards Earth (I've drawn a hyperbolic orbit, but this would apply to any orbit). The object starts at $A$, and at this point it is not rotating i.e. an observer on the object ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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How does angular momentum transfer between a planet and its moon?

Could you explain how a moon draws angular momentum from a planet? I know that the gravitational force transfers momentum, but I don't understand the mechanics behind it.
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2 answers
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Is the length of the day increasing?

In Frontiers of Astronomy, Fred Hoyle advanced an idea from E.E.R.Holmberg that although the Earth's day was originally much shorter than it is now, and has lengthened owing to tidal friction, that ...
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12 votes
4 answers
1k views

Which gets you first when you are falling into a black hole, the black hole singularity or the cosmic background radiation?

If you look up while you are falling into a black hole you see the universe blue shifted, that is, you see the universe moving quickly forward in time compared to your local time. Since this effect ...
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8 votes
2 answers
1k views

Does a tidally locked planet have seasons?

Could a tidally locked planet have seasons? According to my understanding, a tidally locked planet rotates around itself exactly once per rotation around its sun. However, if the axis of rotation of ...
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8 votes
2 answers
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Does the Earth's core have tides?

Does the moon produce a measurable tidal-effect on the Earth's (liquid) core? If so, how strong is it? Would it play a factor in other geological effects like earthquakes, volcanoes, etc?
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3 answers
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Size of black hole so large that I could pass event horizon without dying from tidal forces?

Were I to fall towards a typical black hole, the tidal forces would rip me apart well before I got to the event horizon. However, if a black hole were big enough, I could enter the event horizon ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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If I jump into a black hole, will I see myself passing event horizon? [closed]

Given a black hole with mass of the Milky Way (1.6x10^42 kg), I built a frame that 1 m above the event horizon. I am jumping from this frame my legs down (since I am afraid to dive into a dangerous ...
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