Questions tagged [terminology]

Use this for questions relating to the proper use of physics terminology or nomenclature.

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12
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374 views

Gauge invariant but not gauge covariant regularization

I'm not sure if someone's already asked this before, but I was wondering, in field theory, when we say that a certain field is gauge invariant but not gauge covariant, what does this mean? In ...
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461 views

Who invented the term “Coulomb logarithm”?

Who is the author of the term "Coulomb logarithm"? In fact, Coulomb logarithm was computed by Langmuir in his paper of 1928 where the term "plasma" was introduced into physics, but the term "Coulomb ...
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252 views

Physical interpretation: weighted eigenvalues of the Laplacian with a potential

I'm a mathematician with only the basic knowledge of Physics, so my question may be trivial: in this case, mercy me. :-) Let $\Omega \subseteq \mathbb{R}^N$ be a domain and let $V,m:\Omega \to \...
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63 views

Difference between an electron wiggler and an undulator?

Both wigglers and undulators use periodic magnetic fields applied to stored relativistic electron beams to produce intense beams of UV or X-rays that can be used in a wide range of condensed matter ...
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75 views

When was the phrase “beta function” of renormalization first used?

My question is a historical one: when was the phrase "beta function", as it pertains to the renormalization-group equations, used in physics? I am talking about this beta function: $$\beta_g\equiv \...
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1answer
507 views

Variables in calculation of drag coefficient

Okay, so I looked up drag force equation, and I found that the equation involved the drag coefficient. Then I looked up the drag coefficient, and the equation for it involved the drag force. ...
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145 views

Is the phrase “coupling constant” interchangable with “ strength of interactions”?

Can I use the terms coupling constant and strength of interactions, interchangeably, or are there more subtleties to the term coupling constant that I am not aware of? Coupling Constants from ...
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945 views

What is a Fermi arc?

What is meant with a Fermi arc in the context of Weyl semimetals? Is this the just a one-dimensional Fermi surface? For example, in electron-doped graphene, the Fermi surface consists of 2 disjoint ...
3
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1answer
224 views

What's the difference between linearly polarised and plane-polarised waves?

To explain polarisation, my book gives an example of a transverse wave in a string, and explains as: Since each point on the string moves on a straight line, the wave is also referred to as a ...
3
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1answer
62 views

Mathematical term for the on/off gradient functions in MRI imaging

The slice selection gradients, as well as the phase and frequency, in MRI imaging are traditionally represented by on/off box or rectangular symbols: or My question is what is the mathematical name ...
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226 views

What is a “fiduciary” quantum state?

In Giovanetti et al.'s paper "Quantum Random Access Memory" (arXiv:0708.1879) they state: If the qutrit is initially in the $|wait\rangle$ state, the unitary swaps the state of the qubit in the two ...
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126 views

Terminology for a thermodynamic process in which no work is done

Is there an accepted term to be used when the work done in a process is zero? Fermi, in his book on thermodynamics seems to use "isochoric" even when the work is different from pressure-volume work, ...
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1answer
939 views

What is a Witten diagram?

Recently I heard the terminology of Witten diagram. Studying QFT, I frequently see Feynman diagrams and use them to compute scattering amplitudes, one-loop corrections and so on. In string theory ...
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103 views

What is $\mathrm{U(1)}$ vector and axial?

In hadron physics we talked about $\mathrm{U(1)_V}$ (vector) and $\mathrm{U(1)_A}$ (axial) as well as $\mathrm{SU(3)_L}$ (left) and $\mathrm{SU(3)_R}$ (right). There are certain relations between them ...
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149 views

How can we count 17 particles in the standard model

This may be a bit of numerology, but I'd like to be able to make a statement like "There are 17 particles in the standard model" with some logical definition of a particle. But this statement is ...
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154 views

If the field concept was invented by Faraday, then how did Newton interpret the $g$?

This is Newton's law of universal gravitation. $F=G\frac{m_1.m_2}{r^2}$ Gravitational field $g$ is derived from this formula $g=G\frac{m_1}{r^2}$ This is named gravitational "field" strength. If ...
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2answers
1k views

What is atmospheric stratification?

In the context of atmospheric stability, what are the meanings of stable or unstable stratification? What is stratification?
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93 views

What does unfolding of attractor mean?

What does unfolding of attractor mean? Effect of time scales on the unfolding of neural attractors paper talks about Takens embedding theorum. It says that the embedding dimension should be large ...
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141 views

What does the term 'a uniform RVB spin-liquid state' mean?

I encountered this term a uniform RVB spin-liquid state in some articles, for example, see the paragraph under Eq.(29) on page 9 in this paper. What does the word 'uniform ' mean? Simply from the ...
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458 views

Why supra-conductivity became super-conductivity?

The original article by the Kamerlingh Onnes team in Leiden does not give a name to the new effect: Kamerlingh Onnes, H. Further experiments with liquid helium. C. On the change of electric ...
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159 views

How to name different approaches to relativistic quantum theory

In the introductory chapter of the QFT book by Mark Srednicki the author notes that [p. 26] So now we have two different approaches to relativistic quantum theory [...] Which [one of those two] we ...
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63 views

What name would you give to the method of approximating an arbitrary magnet with many smaller dipoles?

Let's say I had an arbitrarily shaped permanent magnet, with total magnetic moment $M_{0}$. Ways to calculate the magnetic field of this magnet include an analytic solution (if one exists), as well ...
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2answers
633 views

What is the difference between the valence shell and the valence band?

What is the difference between the valence shell and the valence band? The valence band is usually defined as the highest filled band whereas Wikipedia defines the valence shell as the outermost shell ...
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1answer
23 views

Binding energy of a molecular ion?

The protons in the $\text{H}_2^{+}$ molecular ion are $0.106 \, \mathrm{nm}$ apart, and the binding energy of $\text{H}_2^{+}$ is $2.65\,\mathrm{eV} .$ What negative charge must be placed halfway ...
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67 views

Mean field critical exponents and the Gaussian approximation?

A while a go I asked this question on the difference between mean field theory and the Gaussian approximation. This question is related to that. The mean field critical exponents for the Ising model ...
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63 views

Mean Field Theory neglects what flucutations?

This is a topic that has being confusing me for a while. A general phrase that is used in the literature is that: Mean Field theories neglect fluctuations My questions is what is meant by ...
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97 views

What are disordered superconductors? What kind of research is done in this area?

I was talking with a friend of mine and he mentioned that his professor does research on disordered superconductivity. I had a rough idea of what superconductivity is, but when I looked up the term "...
2
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1answer
299 views

What is zero order transmission spectrum?

In the paper The extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelenth hole arrays by T. W. Ebbesen it is shown at particular wavelength there is a peak observed in zero order transmission spectrum. ...
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105 views

The Ising approximation - what exactly is it?

I am slightly confused about the nature of the Ising model to study ferromagnetism. Consider the Heisenberg Hamiltonian with Zeeman term: \[H=-\frac{1}{2} \sum_{i\ne j}J_{ij} S_i\cdot S_j+g\mu_B {B}\...
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1answer
246 views

Classification of field types in QFT

In Classical Field Theory fields are sections of bundles over spacetime. In particular we almost always consider vector bundles. Some examples are: Scalar fields: these are sections of the trivial ...
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415 views

Relation between inertia tensor and moment of inertia about an axis

As far as I understood, we define two quantities: Inertia Tensor - a $3\times3$ matrix, which describes the object "mass" of rotation in relation to a certain point, helping us calculating rotations ...
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126 views

Configuration space of a classical gauge theory: Physics vs. Mathematics

Let's have a look on a gauge theory on a trivial fiber bundle, as it is seen by mathematicians: We have a trivial vector bundle $(E, \pi, M; V)$ with group structure. We denote the sections of $E$ by ...
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77 views

Correct terminology or way to refer to the 2 “types” of ice sublimation

I'm trying to get the right terminology for various forms of phase change. I am familiar with the phase change / triple point diagram for water, and we have various terms for the transition of a ...
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950 views

What is the difference between selection efficiency and acceptance in high energy physics?

Often in papers the product of these two quantities is mentioned, but I'm not sure what exactly they mean separately. My guess would be that one of these is the fraction of the events that you are ...
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199 views

What is the general definition of a quench?

I've seen the term "quench" used in many different contexts. It's easy to understand the meaning when the context has a simple physical analogue, such as lowering the temperature of a system to cause ...
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37 views

What is the name of the basis that uses objects of definite parity?

Currents to which gauge fields couple in four dimensions can be described as follows: $$ \mathcal{L} = -g A_\mu J^\mu. $$ Sometimes it useful to discuss these couplings in the chiral basis, $J_\text{...
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73 views

Terminology - optical (visual) properties of a structure

I am trying to understand few terminological problems that I encounter. Without knowing keywords it is hard to perform search for literature or publications in the area. The area relates to the ...
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0answers
91 views

QFT: What does “finiteness” mean?

As above: what is the definition of a QFT to be "finite"? That all UV corrections are finite and there are no divergences at all? That there are divergences, but these divergences can be absorbed in ...
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123 views

Why are Lagrangian subspaces called 'Lagrangian'?

I am wondering what the special role of Lagrangian subspaces (or submanifolds) are in mechanics. Do these subspaces have some sort of special property for which we have some sort of `Lagrangian ...
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313 views

Effective Field Theories of QCD

Recently, I am studying the online course Effective Field Theory provided by MIT OCW. Prof. Stewart gives a nice picture to summarize the effective theories: As a newbie in this field (I only have a ...
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194 views

Morphisms between chiral CFTs

This is a question about terminology. Given two vertex algebras $V_1$ and $V_2$ (= chiral CFTs), there are two kinds of maps $V_1\to V_2$ that one might want to consider. 1) Morphisms of VOAs that ...
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78 views

What is the 1/2 spin analog of the graviton called?

In some supergravities you have the gravition, gravitino, graviphoton and graviscalar. Each is analogous to each other in only sharing gravitational properties and nothing else. They differ by spin ...
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1k views

de Sitter and anti de Sitter metric

Is the following correct for the distance $d$ from the origin $(0,0)$ to point $(t,x)$ in the 2-dimensional de-Sitter and anti de-Sitter spaces? Here, $t$ is time and the distance may be called the ...
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1answer
20 views

What is the difference between longitudinal chromatic aberration and spherochromatism?

In lens design textbooks, a distinction is often made between longitudinal chromatic aberration and spherochromatism. (See for instance Kingslake's lens design book.) What is simple way to understand ...
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2answers
64 views

Difference between Oscillatory motion and vibratory motion

What is the difference between oscillatory motion and vibratory motion. I have read in my book that "If the amplitude of oscillatory motion is extremely small,the motion is called vibratory motion". ...
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1answer
59 views

What is the area of physics/science called that deals with fundamental limits of computation?

I am interested in learning about the fundamental limits of computation and in particular would like to read textbooks on the subject if they exist. My background is in maths and computer science - I ...
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0answers
65 views

Difference between Critical and orbital velocity

What is the difference between orbital and critical velocity of satallite ? I have read that critical velocity is constant value and it does not depend upon altitude. It only gives the velocity of ...
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2answers
70 views

Nature of motion between comoving observers; What is the common time that they agree on?

This is a set of follow-up questions regarding this post. The following four queries are very closely related and needed to asked at the same place. Question 1 Is it really possible to regard the ...
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47 views

Is there a difference between false (metastable) and local equilibria?

Or is it permissible to use the terms interchangeably? If there is a difference, what is it?
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91 views

What is meant by finite harmonic oscillator?

What does it mean to take finite harmonic oscillator, In research article "http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1367-2630/17/11/113015 ", we were finding effective number of cobosons in ...